Li Shih-Chen

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Li Shih-Chen

(lē′ shər′chŭn′) 1518-1593.
Chinese biologist and pharmacist whose Great Pharmacopoeia (1596) became the standard text of Chinese herbal medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
A book written by physician and herbalist Li Shizhen, "The Compendium of Materia Medica," talks about people in the 1500s using crushed pulp of tadpoles to "cure" sores or welts.
In commemoration of the 500th Anniversary of the birth of Li Shizhen, author of Compendium of Materia Medica, the conference shares the development of Ben Cao (a pharmacopoeia of Chinese herbal medicine) and its potential expansion.
Information about the medical significance of plants is included in writings ranging from the Egyptian Ebers Papyrus from around 1550 BC to the monumental Chinese Bencao Gagmu known as the Compedium of Materia Medica, written by Li Shizhen in the 16th century (2).
(See the renowned herbal guide book Compendium of Materia Medica, by 16th century Chinese pharmacist, Li Shizhen.)
The data in this database is derived from 677 Chinese Formulae books (from 200 BC HAN to 1980) such as Zhang Zhongjing's "Treatise on Cold Damage and Miscellaneous Diseases" (Shang Han Za Bing Lun) and Li Shizhen's "The Compendium of Materia Medica" (Ben Cao Gang Mu), the most comprehensive documentation of the use of medicinal herbs, minerals and animal parts.
The data in this database is derived from 1500 Chinese Formulae books (from 200 BC HAN to 1980) such as Zhang Zhongjing's "Treatise on Cold Damage and Miscellaneous Diseases" and Li Shizhen's "The Compendium of Materia Medica", the most comprehensive documentation of the use of medicinal herbs, minerals and animal parts.
Li Shizhen corroborates this, adding that there are many vernacular common names that duplicate this inciting call.(27) Li characterizes the vocalization of both the bugu and the dujuan as exhortations for spring planting and other farming activities.
In the Bencao gangmu, Li Shizhen preserves the priority accorded the canonized shijiu, instead of questioning it, by explaining the shijiu-daisheng connection in terms of graphic error in the defining Liji passage.
Nevertheless Li Shizhen's explanation is the only one that attempts to explain the conflicting glosses as having evolved from textual error.
In commemoration of the 500th Anniversary of the birth of Li Shizhen, author of Compendium of Materia Medica, the conference will share the development of Ben Cao (a pharmacopoeia of Chinese herbal medicine) and its potential expansion.
"I would have dinner with Li Shizhen, who wrote Compendium of Materia Medica, a work of great scientific, medical, and historical significance.