leukotriene

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Related to Leukotriene antagonists: Leukotriene receptor antagonist

leukotriene

 [loo″ko-tri´ēn]
any of a group of compounds derived from unsaturated fatty acids, primarily arachidonic acid, that are extremely potent mediators of immediate hypersensitivity reactions and inflammation, producing smooth muscle contraction, especially bronchoconstriction, increased vascular permeability, and migration of leukocytes to areas of inflammation. Certain leukotrienes are collectively known as SRS-A (slow reacting substance of anaphylaxis), the name given to their potent bronchoconstrictor activity 30 years before their structure was elucidated; they also cause leakage of fluid and proteins from the microvasculature.

leukotriene

(lo͞o′kə-trī′ēn)
n.
Any of several lipid compounds that contain 20 carbon atoms, are related to prostaglandins, and mediate the inflammatory response.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nizankowska et al., "Improvement of aspirin-intolerant asthma by montelukast, a leukotriene antagonist: a randomized, double-blind, placebocontrolled trial," American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol.
Data Source: Two parallel, multicenter "pragmatic" trials to assess the real-world effectiveness of leukotriene antagonists compared with inhaled glucocorticoids as first-line treatment and compared with long-acting beta-agonists as add-on therapy for poorly controlled asthma.
Less evidence supports the use of leukotriene antagonists and inhaled corticosteroids, either individually or in combination (SOR: B).
[D] Do not commence leukotriene antagonists during pregnancy.
Two second prizes (a tie) were awarded to Angela Naismith (Leukotriene Antagonists) and Craig Jeffrey, MCIC (Photonic Band Gap Materials).
The increasing understanding of leukotriene involvement in inflammation has resulted in the design of new types of anti-inflammatory medications for asthma: leukotriene antagonists.
Omalizumab was evaluated in a pivotal 52-week study of 627 children aged 6-11 years with moderate to severe persistent, inadequately controlled allergic asthma, despite treatment with fluticasone at a dose of 200 mcg or more per day (or the equivalent), with or without other controller medications, which included short-acting beta-agonists (a mean of 2,8 puffs/day) and leukotriene antagonists (37%).
Studies have found that patients never refill 40%-70% of prescriptions for leukotriene antagonists, long-acting [[beta].sub.2]-agonists, and inhaled corticosteroids.
LEUKOTRIENE ANTAGONISTS Mediators other than histamine, including leukotrienes, are involved in the wheal-and-flare urticarial response, so one of the leukotriene antagonists used in asthma may be of benefit.
Further research comparing inhaled corticosteroids with leukotriene antagonists also would be beneficial in supporting the use of leukotriene antagonists as either alternative or add-on therapy in the treatment of chronic asthma.
(1,2) Additional features of the leukotriene antagonists are that they are given orally, thus avoiding any potential patient adherence problems with the use of inhaler devices, but also providing systemic activity and hence suppressing inflammation throughout the airway, including inflammation in the smaller airways.