leucism

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leucism

(lo͞o′kĭz′əm)
n.
A partial loss of pigmentation in a human or other animal, resulting in white, pale, or patchy coloration of the skin, hair, fur, or feathers but not the eyes.

leu·cis′tic (-kĭs′tĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Leucistic adult specimen of Tropidurus hispidus found at Fortaleza de Sao Jose de Macapa, municipality of Macapa, Amapa state, Brazil.
We first searched Web of Science for the terms leucistic, leucism., and partial albinism.
Each of these leucistic birds looks slightly different as many have one or two black or grey feathers and some have the ghosting of the striped plumage on the wing coverts.
Keszey said that leucistic alligators could be worth $100,000 (Dh367,300) or more but stressed that "this gator can't be sold".
Normal (Top, Unvouchered) and leucistic (Bottom, CHFURG 4841) specimens of Atractus reticulatus.
In that passage of time, I had discovered there was a scientific name for the light, creamy-colored bird: leucistic. Leucism occurs in quite a number of bird species, when the pigment in their genetic makeup is off.
Albinistic individuals are characterized by a complete lack of pigmentation in the skin and hair and have pink eyes; leucistic individuals (Fig.
These "ghost" deer weren't albino, but rather leucistic: normal skin and eye color, but only white hair.
But when certain genetic factors interfere with the proper distribution of pigment, they turn out to be albino or leucistic. Such birds are extremely rare and seldom in the wild, most often due to eyesight problems or harassment by other birds.
Partial albinism ("leucism," see below), was responsible for the recognition of several species of primates: Lesson (1831, plate XXXII) named Troglodytes leucoprymnus, as a distinct species of chimpanzee (now known as Pan troglodytes) based on a partially leucistic individual.
We obtained information about these individuals by conducting interviews with local people that provided us with anecdotal information and gave us access to preserved individuals of leucistic Neotropical otters.