Lesion


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Related to Lesion: Hill-Sachs lesion, Skin lesion

lesion

 [le´zhun]
any pathological or traumatic discontinuity of tissue or loss of function of a part. Lesion is a broad term, including wounds, sores, ulcers, tumors, cataracts, and any other tissue damage. They range from the skin sores associated with eczema to the changes in lung tissue that occur in tuberculosis.
Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesion a microscopic spherical hyaline mass surrounded by capillaries, found in the kidney glomerulus in the nodular form of intercapillary glomerulosclerosis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

le·sion

(lē'zhŭn),
1. A wound or injury.
2. A pathologic change in the tissues.
3. One of the individual points or patches of a multifocal disease.
[L. laedo, pp. laesus, to injure]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lesion

(lē′zhən)
n.
Any of various pathological or traumatic changes in a bodily organ or tissue, including tumors, ulcers, sores, and wounds.
tr.v. le·sioned, le·sioning, le·sions
To cause a lesion to form on or in.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lesion

(1) Any pathological or traumatic discontinuity of tissue or loss of function of a part; a wounded or damaged area; an anatomic or functional tissue defect; an area of abnormal tissue change.
 
(2) A nebulous, nonspecific term used by a doctor when discussing a lump or bump with a patient.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

lesion

 Medtalk
1. A wounded or damaged area; an anatomic or functional tissue defect; an area of abnormal tissue change.
2. A nebulous nonspecific term used by a physician when discussing a lump or bump with a Pt. See Mass.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

le·sion

(lē'zhŭn)
1. A wound or injury.
2. A pathologic change in the tissues.
3. One of the individual points or patches of a multifocal disease.
[L. laedo, pp. laesus, to injure]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lesion

A useful and widely used medical term meaning any injury, wound, infection, or any structural or other form of abnormality anywhere in the body. Doctors would be at a loss without this term, but it is commonly wrongly regarded by lay people as implying some specific condition such as an adhesion. The word is derived from the Latin laesio , an attack or injury.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

lesion

a localized area of diseased tissue.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Lesion

Any visible, local abnormality of the tissues of the skin, such as a wound, sore, rash, or boil.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

lesion

Localized, pathological change in a tissue due to injury or disease.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

le·sion

(lē'zhŭn)
1. Wound or injury.
2. Pathologic change in tissues.
3. One of the individual points or patches of a multifocal disease.
[L. laedo, pp. laesus, to injure]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Reich's team showed that by using a high-powered, 7-tesla MRI scanner, they could accurately identify damaging, chronic active lesions by their darkened outer rims, in agreement with previous studies.
Lesion displacement relative to the chest wall and breast size were moderately correlated ([r.sub.s]=0.527, P < 0.001) (Table 2).
In our study most common lesion diagnosed clinically was squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) with the total count of 17, where as 16 were histopathologically proven as SCC while one was diagnosed to be lichen planus.
When the diagnosis of cancer is established, or the biopsy is inconclusive, resection of the lesion is indicated (3).
To analyse the importance of histopathological examination in confirming the diagnosis of various conjunctival lesions like ocular surface squamous neoplasia, malignant melanoma, granulomas.
The orbit is an anatomically complex structure in bony socket of skull having globe, includes eye lids, eye ball, extra ocular muscles, cranial nerves, blood vessels, fat, lacrimal glands, ducts, ciliary ganglions, supported by ligaments and different supportive muscles of the face.1,2 Inflammation or neoplastic lesions of orbit, all affect quality of life greatly.3
Little is known about the natural history of prostate lesions, and the likelihood of identifying new lesions over time.
However, even by following the manufacturer's instructions, the treatment outcome remains unpredictable, especially when it's based merely on the lesion's etiology 8.
considered that CT was suitable for diagnosing lesions with large volume and could evaluate the involvement scope and metastasis of tumor.4 MRI has important values in determining whether lesions are benign or malignant.
On the other hand, the face-to-face diagnoses consisted of pigmented basal cell carcinoma (4), intradermal nevus (6), seborrheic keratosis (4), benign melanocytic lesion (14), blue nevus (3), exogenous pigmentation atypical nevus (2), dermatofibroma (1), congenital nevus (1), solar lentigo (2), and melanoma (3).
Each lesion was categorized as mass, nonmass, or focus enhancement, and further characterized by the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon.
ADC values were automatically calculated by placing the region of interest (ROI) well in the confines of the lesion. A cut off ADC value of 1.26 x 10-3 mm2/s was used for differentiation of benign and malignant lesions of breast.