lesbian

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lesbian

 [lez´be-an]
1. pertaining to lesbianism.
2. a female homosexual.

les·bi·an

(lez'bē-ăn),
1. A female homosexual.
2. Pertaining to homosexuality between women.

lesbian

/les·bi·an/ (lez´be-an)
1. pertaining to homosexuality between women.
2. a female homosexual.

lesbian

[lez′bē·ən]
Etymology: Gk, island of Lesbos, home of Sappho
1 n, a female homosexual.
2 adj, pertaining to the sexual preference or desire of one woman for another. lesbianism, n.
adjective Referring to female homosexuality
noun A female homosexual person

lesbian

adjective Referring to female homosexuality noun A female homosexual

les·bi·an

(lez'bē-ăn)
1. A female homosexual or a female homosexual lifestyle.
2. One who practices lesbianism.
See also: gay
References in periodicals archive ?
If employers believe lesbian women are as attached to the labor force as men then there is no reason to penalize them in anticipation of work disruption.
Several studies indicate that a substantial proportion of lesbian women reported having had romantic relationships with men, both sexual and long-term (Bailey, Farquhar, & Owen, 2003; Brooks, 1981; Koh et al.
It is important to understand that the ways in which women are treated and the ways in which sexual minority individuals are treated may be impacted by the ways in which lesbian women in particular engage in gender expression.
Warner pointed out that current slick lifestyle magazines for gay men and lesbian women have replaced earlier publications in which "you could find serious, innovative thought alongside news coverage" (p.
In spite of this increased visibility and acceptance--and just as African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans continue to experience job discrimination (Bowman, 1993)--gay men and lesbian women continue to experience difficulty in the workplace (Adams, 1997; Anastas, 1998; Diamant, 1993; Kirby, 2002).
Although the experience varies for each individual woman according to her background, environment, and personality, all lesbian women of color share a common element in that they personally are confronted with living in a society that sustains racism, sexism, and heterosexism.
The book is replete with examples of how the history of psychoanalysis has contributed to scientific distortions and oppression of gay men and lesbian women, and has and continues to be used by some psychoanalysts to mask bigotry and prejudice in the name of (pseudo) science.
Those defending the rights of lesbian women to in vitro technologies also had to assume this same position of silence.
In taped and transcribed interviews from which Schallenberger quotes verbatim and at length, gay men and lesbian women freely speak of their concerns about integrating their sexual and religious identities.
This study combined focus group data (N=44) with a self-administered questionnaire (N=576) to explore the health concerns of lesbian women, including the prevalence of risk factors for cervical cancer, the frequency of Papanicolaou (Pap) test screening, and the barriers to obtaining care.
Here Lunbeck analyzes psychiatrists' and social workers' encounters with "hypersexual" women, female hysterics, "psychopathic" men, and lesbian women.
Women's, men's and young peoples health care are addressed in separate chapters, concentrating on health issues often neglected in other nursing texts and the health needs of lesbian women and gay men are discussed in a sensitive manner.

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