Leptotrombidium

Leptotrombidium

(lep'tō-trom-bid'ē-ŭm),
An important genus of trombiculid mites, formerly considered a subgenus of the genus Trombicula, which includes all of the vectors of scrub typhus (tsutsugamushi disease). Members of Leptotrombidium that serve as vectors of scrub typhus are within the Leptotrombidium deliense group: Leptotrombidium akamushi is the classical vector in Japan; Leptotrombidium deliense is the primary vector, extending from New Guinea, Australia, the Philippines, China, and Southeast Asia to western Pakistan; Leptotrombidium fletcheri is found in Malaysia, New Guinea, and the Philippines. Some eight other species have also been implicated in scrub typhus transmission in more limited areas.

Lep·to·trom·bid·i·um

(lep'tō-trom-bid'ē-ŭm)
An important genus of trombiculid mites, which includes all of the vectors of scrub typhus (tsutsugamushi disease).

Leptotrombidium

genus of the family Trombiculidae. The mites act as vectors of the human scrub typhus agent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Parasite Location Prevalence (a) Apicomplexa Eimeria pilarensis NM 1/12 (8%) Eimeria rioarribaensis NM 4/22 (18%) MX (b) 1/21 (5%) Trematoda Plagiorchis micracanthos SD 1/1 (100%) Nematoda Longibucca lasiura CAN (d) 1/10 (10%) Acari Leptotrombidium myotis SD not stated MT 1/6 (17%) OR not stated Macronyssidae (nymphs) CA 1/1 (100%) (c) Macronyssus crosbyi NM 1/1 (100%) Ornithodoros sp.
Of the 3 patients, the woman and the boy had other vectorborne infections: scrub typhus, transmitted by Leptotrombidium mites, and P.
Mite larvae, or chiggers, of the genus Leptotrombidium transmit the causative bacteria to humans through their bite.
Collected chiggers were classified to 4 species: Leptotrombidium deliense (47.
tsutsugamushi was detected in an individual mite, Leptotrombidium arenicola (9), a probable vector of scrub typhus.
5% identity), which was originally isolated from Leptotrombidium fuji mites in Japan (12).
Scrub typhus: vector competence of Leptotrombidium chiangraiensis chiggers and transmission efficacy and isolation of Orientia tsutsugamushi.
First, infection with Orientia tsutsugamushi is associated with production of all-female broods in the trombiculid mite, Leptotrombidium fletcheri (18,19); in this example, the nature of the resultant sex-ratio distortion (primary vs.
Among these mites, 2,100 Leptotrombidium deliense accounted for 94.
Leptotrombidium pallidum, a common mite in Korea, first appears in September.
In an entomologic study in Himachal Pradesh, vector species Leptotrombidium deliense and Gahrliepia (schoengastilla) spp.
tsutsugamushi is transmitted vertically in mites (particularly Leptotrombidium species) by the transovarial route, and horizontally in rodents through trombiculid larval (chigger) bites.