Leptotrichia


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Leptotrichia

 [lep″to-trik´e-ah]
a genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, straight or slightly curved, rod-shaped bacteria; L. bucca´lis is sometimes associated with oral or urogenital infections.

Leptotrichia

(lep'tō-trik'ē-ă),
A genus of anaerobic, nonmotile bacteria containing gram-negative, straight or slightly curved rods, 5-15 mcm in length, with one or both ends rounded, often pointed. Granules are distributed evenly along the long axis, and one or more large granules may localize near the end of the cell. Branched or clubbed forms do not occur. Two or more cells join together and form septate filaments of varying length; in older cultures, filaments up to 200 mcm may form and twist around each other; large, coccoid bodies may be found within a filament as a cell lyses. Carbon dioxide is essential for optimal growth. Lactic acid is produced from glucose. These organisms occur in the oral cavity of humans. The type species is Leptotrichia buccalis.
[lepto- + G. thrix, hair]

Lep·to·trich·i·a

(lep'tō-trik'ē-ă)
A genus of anaerobic, nonmotile bacteria containing gram-negative, straight or slightly curved rods, with one or both ends rounded or pointed. These organisms occur in the human oral cavity. The type species is L. buccalis.
[lepto- + G. thrix, hair]

Lep·to·trich·i·a

(lep'tō-trik'ē-ă)
Genus of anaerobic, nonmotile bacteria containing gram-negative, straight or slightly curved rods, with one or both ends rounded or pointed; found in human oral cavity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Group 2 (saliva, tongue, tonsils, and posterior pharyngeal wall) demonstrated a decreased relative abundance of Firmicutes compared to Group 1 replaced by increased levels of four phyla: Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, Actinobacteria and the candidate phylum TM7, and with a predominance of Streptococcus (approximately 20%), followed by approximately equal abundance of the genera Veillonella, Prevotella, Neisseria, Fusobacterium, Actinomyces and Leptotrichia
UU-2 expresses tetracycline resistance in up to 45% of patients, while resistance to Leptotrichia is largely unknown because of the difficulty in culturing fastidious bacteria in vitro.
In addition, resistance to vaginal metronidazole has been reported among pregnant women with BV who carry the Leptotrichia or Sneathia species or BV-associated bacterium 1 (BVAB1) (BMC Infect.
UU-2 expresses tetracycline resistance in up to 45% of patients, while antimicrobial resistance to Leptotrichia is largely unknown because of the difficulty in culturing fastidious bacteria in vitro.
Leptotrichia species are typically anaerobic, non-sporulating, non-motile, highly saccharolytic, Gram-negative bacilli found, primarily, as normal flora in the mouth, but can also be found in the intestinal tract and female genital tract.
Leptotrichia belongs to the family Fusobacteriaceae and in the phylum Fusobacteria.
Purification and quantitative chemical analysis of cell wall peptidoglycans of Leptotrichia buccalis.
In the fluid developed between the first and sixth month of breastfeeding, bacteria typical of the oral cavity were observed, such as Veillonella, Leptotrichia and Prevotella.
There were two isolates of Leptotrichia sanguinegens, one of human oral bacterium A33, another of Fusobacterium nucleatum, and another of Ureaplasma urealyticum, Dr.
17 89 Streptococcus sanguinis 99 Gemella sanguinis 99 Leptotrichia sp.
16S rRNA gene amplification and sequencing detected pyosalpinx, caused by Leptotrichia amnioni, in a patient whose samples were culture-negative.