Lepidoptera

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Lep·i·dop·ter·a

(lep'i-dop'tĕr-ă),
An order of insects composed of the moths and butterflies, characterized by wings covered with delicate scales.
[G. lepis, scale, + pteron, wing]

Lepidoptera

(lĕp″ĭ-dŏp′tĕr-ă) [″ + pteron, feather, wing]
An order of the class Insecta that includes the butterflies, moths, and skippers; characterized by scaly wings, sucking mouth parts, and complete metamorphosis.
Lepidopteraclick for a larger image
Fig. 208 Lepidoptera . General structure.

Lepidoptera

the ENDOPTERYGOTE order of insects containing butterflies and moths, characterized by the presence of scales on the wings and body. Butterflies and moths are no longer classed as separate taxa. The larvae are caterpillars, which feed mainly on plant tissues; the winged adults are usually nectar feeders and are important in pollination.
References in periodicals archive ?
Out of ten pigeonpea genotypes, four genotypes were found least susceptible to lepidopteran pod borer damage as they showed a damage rating of 4-5 on a Pest Susceptibility Rating Scale of 1-9 (Table 2).
44" W 94 Table 2--Trichogramma species associated with pest lepidopterans on crops in the Mid-North of Brazil, from 2011 to 2013 and in 2015.
A large presence of miller moths at the study area during the spring of 2002 coincided with the phenology of lepidopterans in the diet of big brown bats.
Introduction of cry1Ab gene into cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) enhances resistance against Lepidopteran pest (Helicoverpa armigera).
An approach to its use in the biological control of lepidopteran insects behaving as agricultural pests.
CCA was applied to check the effect of different environmental factors on distribution of lepidopterans (Rana et al.
Abstract: Biological control of lepidopteran defoliators using parasitoids is a promising alternative.
Our understanding of the factors that explain ecological patterns of lepidopteran communities such as the spatial and temporal distribution of species is still limited in relatively undisturbed ecosystems (DEVRIES et al,, 2009) and almost inexistent in restored areas (HOLL, 1996; RIES et al.
An artificial diet intended for lepidopterans was successfully utilized only after the first generation because the newly hatched larvae had not previously been in contact with any natural food source and artificial diet was readily accepted.
On Crane, the diet was dominated by lepidopterans, coleopterans, and trichopterans; the spotted cucumber beetle was 5.
This study reports on the isolation of Bt from caterpillar guts, fecal pellets and host plants collected in different protected ecosystems (dry, rain and cloud tropical forests) as a contribution to the better understanding of Bt ecology in relation to lepidopterans in wildland environments.