lenticel

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Fig. 207 Lenticel . Transverse section of the outer stem.

lenticel

a small pore found on the surface of stems and roots in higher plants. Lenticels usually arise below the STOMATA of the original epidermis, where loose packing tissue becomes waterproofed with SUBERIN, leaving large intercellular spaces through which gas exchange can take place. Lenticels are surrounded by a CORK layer.
References in periodicals archive ?
The thermodynamic analyses of cork, sclereids, and lenticels at different heating rates were studied to obtain the basic information that may differ from wood.
The presence of the tightly packed stellate trichomes, the stomata type, density, distribution, and length, the lenticels on the midrib, and the different textural cuticle found on the epidermis could be useful in providing taxonomic information and could also serve as a database for future references of the species.
Lianas or scandent shrubs; branchlets cylindrical, striated, with lenticels, tomentose to glabrescent, without interpetiolar gland fields.
It was reported that a swelling of the submerged portions of the stem base [27] and the appearance of hypertrophic lenticels [27, 28] also facilitated oxygen entry into the aerenchyma of the nearby adventitious roots [29].
Reduces weight loss, decay, incidence of jelly seed, lenticels spots and chilling injury.
Distinctive pores, called lenticels, facilitate the controlled gas exchange--necessary for bark photosynthesis--of carbon dioxide and oxygen through the protective outer bark.
Ben-Arie (2001) reported that MAP is still not commercial technique for mangoes because it delays the ripening but fruits suffer from the appearance of red or green spots around the lenticels. Lalel et al.
The impact assessments were made on the basis of performance against sap burn, skin browning, lenticels spots, rots and physical damage.
Morphological and anatomical structures that confer adaptation to prolonged flooding include adventitious roots, increased aerenchyma tissue in stems, and development of hypertrophic stem lenticels (Schaffer et al.
The significance of lenticels for successful Pityogenes chalcographus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) invasion of Norway spruce trees [Picea abies (Pinaceae)].
Fruit obovoid to 2 cm high and 1.8 cm in diameter, often with abortive carpels visible and more or less developed, exocarp nearly smooth when fresh, red at maturity, dotted with lenticels, perianth with triangular petals, staminodes triangular, obtuse at apex, to 2 mm long, sometimes with abortive anther.
Other important morphological adaptations include hypertrophy of lenticels, adventitious roots, plank-buttressing, stilt rooting, aerenchyma, suberin and ligin in the foot peripheral cell layers.