Lemierre syndrome

Lemierre syndrome

 [lĕ-myer´]
thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein with secondary spread of infection, resulting from an acute oropharyngeal infection.
References in periodicals archive ?
Increased diagnosis of Lemierre syndrome and other Fusobacterium necrophorum infections at a children's hospital," Pediatrics, vol.
Lemierre syndrome following oropharyngeal infection: A case series.
Lemierre syndrome or postanginal sepsis (necrobacillosis) is characterized by septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein (IJV) with frequent metastatic infections, usually due to anaerobic organisms.
Lemierre syndrome, which is a severe suppurative complication of bacterial pharyngitis, needs to be considered.
Baig MA, Rasheed J, Subkowitz D, Vieira J: A review of lemierre syndrome.
2) Clinical criteria to further define Lemierre syndrome were coined in 1989 by Sinave et al, and consists of: (1) primary infection of the oropharynx; (2) bacteremia as evidenced by one or more positive blood culture; (3) clinical or radiologic evidence of internal jugular vein thrombosis; and (4) at least one metastatic focus.
Also a rare entity, Lemierre syndrome is a thrombophlebitis that develops as a complication of an oropharyngeal infection.
Abstract: Lemierre syndrome is septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein caused typically by an oropharyngeal infection.
Lemierre syndrome (also known as postanginal sepsis).
2,3) Ultrasound, CT, or MRI can be used for evaluating jugular vein patency in patients with suspected Lemierre syndrome (internal jugular vein thrombophlebitis and septic emboli secondary to pharyngotonsillitis).
Lemierre syndrome develops after pharyngeal infection secondary to the virulent nature of the Gram-negative anaerobe F necrophorum, part of the normal flora of the oropharynx, female genital tract, and alimentary canal.