Leloir

Le·loir

(lə-lwär′, lĕ-), Luis Federico 1906-1987.
French-born Argentine biochemist. He won a 1970 Nobel Prize for the discovery of sugar nucleotides and their role in the biosynthesis of carbohydrates.
References in periodicals archive ?
See Louis Leloir, ed., Saint Ephrem, commentaire de l'Evangile concordant, texte syriaque (manuscrit Chester Beatty 709) (Dublin: Hodges Figgis & Co., 1963); and Saint Ephrem, commentaire de l'Evangile concordant, texte syriaque (manuscrit Chester Beatty 709): Folios additionnels (Leuven: Peeters, 1990).
Just one day after Henri Kling's death young Edmond Leloir celebrated his 6th birthday in Belgium.
Legend actually places the origins of the condiment in the 1920s in Argentina, where it's often referred to as "salsa golf." According to lore, a teenager named Luis Federico Leloir was eating prawns with friends at the Mar del Plata Golf Club in the coastal city of Mar del Plata when he decided to try an experiment, Ozy recounted.
Further, IFN-[alpha] stimulation of MDM was associated with the downregulation of genes associated with the Leloir pathway (GALK2, GALT, and GALE), which is responsible for the conversion of galactose to glucose.
However, the simultaneous consumption of these monosaccharides by yeast requires acclimated strains because the presence of glucose induces repression of the enzymes of the Leloir pathway, related to galactose metabolism (Park et al., 2014).
Luis Leloir, who also received a Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1970, belonged to that team as well.
The current address of Juan Ignacio Romero is Fundacion Instituto Leloir, Av.
Fernando Goldbaum, Fundacion Instituto Leloir, Buenos Aires, Argentina) were cultured at 37[degrees]C in 5% C[O.sub.2] with 95% air in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium containing 10% (v/v) heat inactivated fetal bovine serum (Bioser, Argentina), and 2 mM glutamine.
Leloir, had received the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1970.