Legionella pneumophila


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Le·gion·el·la pneu·mo·'phi·la

a bacterial species that is the primary etiologic agent of Legionnaires disease; believed to grow in plumbing systems or in standing water in ventilation systems. The type species of the genus Legionella.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Le·gion·el·la pneu·mo·phi·la

(lē-jŏ-nela nū-mō-filă)
Bacterial species that is the primary etiologic agent of Legionnaires' disease; believed to grow in plumbing systems or in standing water in ventilation systems. The type species of the genus Legionella.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Legionella pneumophila

A thin GRAM NEGATIVE rod organism that grows in a medium rich in iron and cysteine. It is the cause of LEGIONNAIRES' DISEASE.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Addition of neuA, the gene encoding N-acylneuraminate cytidylyl transferase, increases the discriminatory ability of the consensus sequence-based scheme for typing Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains.
Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from Tehran Hospital water samples.
Exploring the Legionella pneumophila positivity rate in hotel water samples from Antalya, Turkey.
Mentasti et al., "Multiple major disease-associated clones of Legionella pneumophila have emerged recently and independently," Genome Research, vol.
Specific detection of Legionella pneumophila: construction of a new 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe.
90 blood samples collected were subjected to ELISA to detect IgM antibody (EUROIMMUN) for Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae was performed according to manufacturer's instructions.
The second section addresses the problems this bacteria creates in healthcare, discussing the study of biofilms and biofilm development; biofilms and healthcare-associated infections; the formation of biofilms; their role in intravascular catheter infections; ventilator-associated pneumonia, endotracheal tubes, and biofilms; antimicrobial chemotherapy; the biology of biofilm recalcitrance; microbial resistance and superbugs; preventing infection associated with urethral catheter biofilms; the presence and control of Legionella pneumophila and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in hospital water systems; and wound infection.
No patient was found to be infected by Legionella pneumophila in this study.
The pathogen behind it was identified as a bacterium called Legionella pneumophila that proliferates in systems of standing water at temperatures between 25[degrees]-50[degrees]C, such as water reservoirs, boilers, fountains, whirlpool tubs, or intermittently used water pipes.