insanity

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insanity

 [in-san´ĭ-te]
a medically obsolete term for mental derangement or disorder. Insanity is now a purely legal term, denoting a condition due to which a person lacks criminal responsibility for a crime and therefore cannot be convicted of it. adj., insane´.

in·san·i·ty

(in-san'i-tē), This is a legal term denoting mental incompetence and moral irresponsibility but having no specific medical meaning.
1. An outmoded term referring to severe mental illness or psychosis.
2. In law, the degree of mental illness that negates the patient's legal responsibility or capacity.
[L. in- neg. + sanus, sound]
Forensics A legal and social term for a condition that renders the affected person unfit to enjoy liberty of action, because of the unreliability of his behaviour with concomitant danger to himself and others; insanity denotes, by extension, a degree of mental illness that negates legal responsibility for one’s actions
Psychiatry A vague obsolete term for psychosis

insanity

Forensic medicine A legal and social term for a condition that renders the affected person unfit to enjoy liberty of action, because of the unreliability of his behavior with concomitant danger to himself and others; insanity denotes, by extension, a degree of mental illness that negates legal responsibility for one's actions. See Psychosis, Temporary insanity Psychiatry A vague obsolete term for psychosis.

in·san·i·ty

(in-san'i-tē)
1. A nonmedical term referring to severe mental illness or psychosis.
2. law That degree of mental illness that negates the person's legal responsibility or capacity.
[L. in- neg. + sanus, sound]

insanity

A legal rather than a medical term, implying a disorder of the mind of such degree as to interfere with a person's ability to be legally responsible for his or her actions. The term is little used in medicine but might equate to PSYCHOSIS. A defence of insanity, in law, is governed by the McNaughten Rules. These state, in part, ‘The jurors ought to be told in all cases that every man is presumed to be sane and to possess a sufficient degree of reason to be responsible for his crimes, until the contrary be proved to their satisfaction: and that to establish a defence on the grounds of insanity, it must be clearly proved that, at the time of the committing of the act, the party accused was labouring under such a defect of reason, from disease of the mind, as not to know the nature and quality of the act he was doing or, if he did know it, that he did not know he was doing what was wrong.’
References in periodicals archive ?
Phillip Resnick commented: "My opinion was in both [the cases of Yates and Laney] they were legally insane. But Ms.
of an exaggerated cultural paranoia, which presumably then becomes an unhealthy cultural paranoia, the black rage actor is not much different from the paranoid schizophrenic actor who generally qualifies as legally insane.
Although the social worker could not provide an opinion that the defendant was legally insane, the dissent argued that he could testify that there was a non-drug-induced cause of the defendant's psychosis and, together with the expert's testimony, this and the other lay testimony provided a sufficient basis for the defendant to establish a prima facie case for an insanity defense.
"People who are legally insane and unfit to plead are a matter for a jury to investigate.
Lee Boyd Malvo was legally insane during last year's sniper spree because of intense indoctrination by sniper mastermind John Allen Muhammad, a defence psychiatrist testified at Malvo's trial in Chesapeake, Virginia.
Teenager Lee Boyd Malvo was legally insane during last year's sniper spree because of intense indoctrination by US sniper mastermind John Allen Muhammad, a defence psychiatrist testified at Malvo's trial in Chesapeake, Virginia.
He points out that the vast majority of people considered legally insane suffer from severe psychiatric illnesses if not psychotic disorders.
University of Virginia professor and psychologist Daniel Murrie told the jury that while Fields was not legally insane at the time of the attack, he had inexplicable outbursts as a child and was diagnosed with bipolar disorder at 6.
Forrester, formerly of Lower Villiers Street in Blakenhall, denies murdering Jasmine on the basis he was "legally insane" at the time of the killing.
She claims to have been "legally insane" at the time because of drug use.
A forensic psychologist testified for prosecutors that Routh was not legally insane and suggested he may have gotten some of his ideas from television.
One psychiatric examination found him legally insane while another reached the opposite conclusion.