service of process

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service of process

[sur′vis]
Etymology: L, servus, a slave, processus, going forth
(in law) the delivery of a writ, summons, or complaint to a defendant. Once delivered or left with the party for whom it is intended, it is said to have been served. The original of the document is shown; a copy is served. Service of process gives reasonable notice to allow the person to appear, testify, and be heard in court.
References in periodicals archive ?
From physicians in court defending malpractice accusations to criminal prosecutors gone awry, Fair Trials, Legal Process & Other Myths is packed with various examples of how lawyers choose to handle cases.
cases are resolved, the legal process available to Guantanamo detainees
The proceedings mark the first steps in a legal process that could take months and possibly years to complete.
By using expertise, local knowledge and experience backed by cutting edge technology, the company can make the legal process as quick and stress-free as possible.
Indeed, LRP's conduct has been substantially vindicated by the legal process in that after years of litigation, Law Bulletin was awarded $1.
He said: "It is very sad she died not knowing the first stage of the legal process to clear her name had been granted.
Bidinotto argues that when "relevant and reliable" evidence is suppressed on procedural grounds, neither the lawbreaker nor the government agent who has acted improperly is held accountable for his misconduct; the legal process ceases to be a "search for truth," and "the only one who suffers is the crime victim.
In the epilogue to In the Matter of Color, his first volume on race and the American legal process, eminent jurist A.
I saw my first copy of The Legal Process during law school when a professor lent me his dogeared photocopy of Henry Hart(1) and Albert Sacks's(2) manuscript.
To be effective, a forensic accountant must command a thorough understanding of the legal process, its unique language and the rules of evidence used in both federal and state courts.
Augustin's intellectual commitments grew out of the humanistically-inspired jurisprudence of Bude and Alciato, and he aspired to situate legal scholarship upon a concrete knowledge of ancient legal process.
In 1971, Judge Skelly Wright felt that the legal process Forewords of the 1950s and 1960s were such a strong influence and force to be reckoned with that he placed them within "the scholarly tradition"--a unique "mode of scholarly criticism"--and felt the need to criticize the view of the Supreme Court's limited role they espoused.