criminal law

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Related to Legal liability: legally responsible

crim·i·nal law

(krimĭ-năl law)
Legislation dealing with crime and its punishment.

criminal law

The area of the law relating to violations of statutes that pertain to public offenses or acts committed against the public. For example, a health care provider can be prosecuted for criminal acts such as assault and battery, fraud, and abuse.
See also: law
References in periodicals archive ?
taxpayers have sought to "hype" their foreign tax credit by splitting the foreign taxes from the underlying income through the affirmative use of a perceived ambiguity in the legal liability rule and/or the U.S.
Gregg is an active speaker and author in the field of managing risks of legal liability in education and recreation programs.
Issues addressed during that period included specialization, fraud detection, legal liability, standards overload, advertising, competitive bidding, solicitation, contingent fees and commissions.
* Props, wardrobe and set coverage: protects the producers' insurable interest or legal liability in the value of props, set, wardrobe and related equipment.
Other often overlooked subjects effectively treated here are safety concerns and issues of legal liability.
Keep abreast of the most current legal liability and industry issues with this valuable monthly newsletter.
901 guidance on applying the "legal liability rule" contained in Regs.
To frame the debate, the DM raised nine questions relating to whether there should be new requirements for auditors to detect fraud and related implications on auditor independence, legal liability, training and certification.
The Life Office Management Association has released a new report, The New World of Risk, examining how insurers are increasingly underwriting man-made risks, such as those involved in terrorism, technological networks, and legal liability. The report describes these risk exposures in detail and the efforts being made by the United States government and other institutions to control them.
She also has served as a NASBA Pacific Regional Director and director-at-large; chair of the CPA Examination Review Board; and a member of the CPE Registry, Legal Liability, Licensing Requirements, Reciprocity and Search committees.
Specific risks of having inadequate privacy policies and procedures include damage to the organization's reputation, brand or business relationships; legal liability; customer or employee distrust; and loss of revenue and market share.