insanity

(redirected from Legal insanity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to Legal insanity: Insanity defense, insanity plea

insanity

 [in-san´ĭ-te]
a medically obsolete term for mental derangement or disorder. Insanity is now a purely legal term, denoting a condition due to which a person lacks criminal responsibility for a crime and therefore cannot be convicted of it. adj., insane´.

in·san·i·ty

(in-san'i-tē), This is a legal term denoting mental incompetence and moral irresponsibility but having no specific medical meaning.
1. An outmoded term referring to severe mental illness or psychosis.
2. In law, the degree of mental illness that negates the patient's legal responsibility or capacity.
[L. in- neg. + sanus, sound]

insanity

/in·san·i·ty/ (in-san´it-e) a legal term for mental illness of such degree that the individual is not responsible for his or her acts.insane´

insanity

[insan′itē]
Etymology: L, in, not, sanus, sound
Usage notes: (informal)
a term used more in legal and social than in medical terminology. It refers to those mental illnesses that are of such a serious or debilitating nature as to interfere with one's capability of functioning within the legal limits of society and performing the normal activities of daily living.
Forensics A legal and social term for a condition that renders the affected person unfit to enjoy liberty of action, because of the unreliability of his behaviour with concomitant danger to himself and others; insanity denotes, by extension, a degree of mental illness that negates legal responsibility for one’s actions
Psychiatry A vague obsolete term for psychosis

insanity

Forensic medicine A legal and social term for a condition that renders the affected person unfit to enjoy liberty of action, because of the unreliability of his behavior with concomitant danger to himself and others; insanity denotes, by extension, a degree of mental illness that negates legal responsibility for one's actions. See Psychosis, Temporary insanity Psychiatry A vague obsolete term for psychosis.

in·san·i·ty

(in-san'i-tē)
1. A nonmedical term referring to severe mental illness or psychosis.
2. law That degree of mental illness that negates the person's legal responsibility or capacity.
[L. in- neg. + sanus, sound]

insanity

A legal rather than a medical term, implying a disorder of the mind of such degree as to interfere with a person's ability to be legally responsible for his or her actions. The term is little used in medicine but might equate to PSYCHOSIS. A defence of insanity, in law, is governed by the McNaughten Rules. These state, in part, ‘The jurors ought to be told in all cases that every man is presumed to be sane and to possess a sufficient degree of reason to be responsible for his crimes, until the contrary be proved to their satisfaction: and that to establish a defence on the grounds of insanity, it must be clearly proved that, at the time of the committing of the act, the party accused was labouring under such a defect of reason, from disease of the mind, as not to know the nature and quality of the act he was doing or, if he did know it, that he did not know he was doing what was wrong.’
References in periodicals archive ?
can be distinguished from legal insanity and rebutting expert
If the defendant chooses to raise legal insanity or mens rea
It can be argued that these patients detained as a result of a finding of unfitness or legal insanity constitute a special legal category - in the sense that they remain unconvicted but were subject to automatic and indeterminate hospitalization - and while recognizing that the provisions of the Criminal Procedure (Insanity and Unfitness to Plead) Act 1991 are not retrospective,(11) it would surely not be outside the spirit of the Act to ~flag' these cases for special consideration in respect of the need for continuing detention.
The relevance of mental disorder to legal insanity tests is
Before concluding the discussion of legal insanity, it is important
Hans & Dan Slater, "Plain Crazy ": Lay Definitions of Legal Insanity, 7 INT'L J.
190) Verdicts pronouncing legal insanity however, generally are not favored in society.
Under this rule, to prove legal insanity one must show that the accused suffered from a disease of the mind at the time of the crime and did not know the nature and quality of the act, or if he did know, that he did not know the act was wrong.
175) Because extreme mental disturbance constitutes a lower legal hurdle than does legal insanity, instances of black rage will more readily qualify under the partial insanity prong of the Model Penal Code.
As for the part that psychologists and psychiatrists play in the insanity defense, the Frye standard deems generally accepted tests and evidence admissible at trial to prove legal insanity.
17) In the United States, courts continue to evaluate postpartum depression defenses and other mental illnesses under the existing insanity defense, (18) The prevailing insanity defense test (19) applied across United States jurisdictions is extremely narrow and makes proving legal insanity exceptionally difficult for even the most severely postpartum psychotic women.
Brower finds the defendant: "insane (medically) and that the form of insanity if paranoia--As to his legal insanity, which as I understand it, is about synonymous with responsibility, I have some doubt--because of insufficient information as to family & personal history.

Full browser ?