informed consent

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Related to Legal consent: age of consent

consent

 [kon-sent´]
in law, voluntary agreement with an action proposed by another. Consent is an act of reason; the person giving consent must be of sufficient mental capacity and be in possession of all essential information in order to give valid consent. A person who is an infant, is mentally incompetent, or is under the influence of drugs is incapable of giving consent. Consent must also be free of coercion or fraud.
informed consent consent of a patient or other recipient of services based on the principles of autonomy and privacy; this has become the requirement at the center of morally valid decision making in health care and research. Seven criteria define informed consent: (1) competence to understand and to decide, (2) voluntary decision making, (3) disclosure of material information, (4) recommendation of a plan, (5) comprehension of terms (3) and (4), (6) decision in favor of a plan, and (7) authorization of the plan. A person gives informed consent only if all of these criteria are met. If all of the criteria are met except that the person rejects the plan, that person makes an informed refusal.

In nonemergency situations, written informed consent is generally required before many medical procedures, such as surgery, including biopsies, endoscopy, and radiographic procedures involving catheterization. The physician must explain to the patient the diagnosis, the nature of the procedure, including the risks involved and the chances of success, and the alternative methods of treatment that are available. Nurses or other members of the health care team may be involved in filling out the consent form and witnessing the signature of the patient or the parent or guardian, if the patient is a minor. In medical research, the patient must be informed that the procedure is experimental and that consent can be withdrawn at any time. In addition, the person signing the consent form must be informed of the risks and benefits of the experimental procedure and of alternative treatments.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·formed con·sent

(in-fōrmd' kŏn-sent'),
Voluntary agreement given by a person or a patients' responsible proxy (for example, a parent) for participation in a study, immunization program, treatment regimen, invasive procedure, etc., after being informed of the purpose, methods, procedures, benefits, and risks. The essential criteria of informed consent are that the subject has both knowledge and comprehension, that consent is freely given without duress or undue influence, and that the right of withdrawal at any time is clearly communicated to the patient. Other aspects of informed consent in the context of epidemiologic and biomedical research, and criteria to be met in obtaining it, are specified in International Guidelines for Ethical Review of Epidemiologic Studies (Geneva: CIOMS/WHO 1991) and International Ethical Guidelines for Biomedical Research Involving Human Subjects (Geneva: CIOMS/WHO 1993).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

informed consent

n.
Consent by a person to undergo a medical procedure, participate in a clinical trial, or be counseled by a professional such as a social worker or lawyer, after receiving all material information regarding risks, benefits, and alternatives.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

informed consent

EBM
In a clinical trial, an ongoing (in contrast to the “one-off” informed consents of non-trial-related clinical practice) interactive process that provides a trial participant (subject) with explanations to help him or her make educated decisions about whether to begin or continue participating in a trial.

Under 21 CFR 50.20, no informed consent form may include any "language through which the subject or the representative is made to waive or appear to waive any of the subject's legal rights, or releases or appears to release the investigator, the sponsor, the institution, or its agents from liability for negligence."
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

informed consent

Medtalk A voluntary, legally documented agreement by the Pt to allow performance of a specific diagnostic, therapeutic, or research procedure. See Emergency doctrine, Informed decision, Malpractice, Therapeutic privilege doctrine.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·form·ed con·sent

(in-fōrmd kŏn-sent)
Voluntary agreement given by a person or a responsible proxy (e.g., a parent) for participation in a study, immunization program, or treatment regimen, after being informed of the purpose, methods, procedures, benefits, and risks. The essential criteria of informed consent are that the subject has both knowledge and comprehension, that consent is freely given without duress or undue influence, and that the right of withdrawal from the entity at any time is clearly communciated to the subject.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

informed consent

The formal agreement to a surgical or medical procedure by a patient who has been adequately briefed on what is proposed and who is fully aware of all reasonably possible side effects or complications.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

in·form·ed con·sent

(in-fōrmd kŏn-sent)
Voluntary agreement given by a patient or a patient's designated responsible proxy (e.g., a parent) for participation in a study, immunization program, treatment regimen, invasive procedure, or other medical or dental undertaking after being informed of the purpose, methods, procedures, benefits, and risks.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Depending on the circumstances, consent can "transfer[] at least part of the responsibility for one person's act to the shoulders of the consenter." (65) "Legal consent ...
The relationship between legal consent and social policy is reflected by the class of individuals who are permitted to consent to certain types of conduct at certain times.
While consent obtained through coercion is not legal consent, the term consent will be used in this section to refer to factual consent.
He might argue that jurisdictions plausibly distinguish legal consent from moral consent, for they are wary about allowing defendants to claim consent as a defense to legally prohibited conduct without requiring them to meet elevated evidentiary standards and, perhaps, elevated standards of freedom and rationality on the part of their complainants.
Professor Westen might thus argue that even if I am right in thinking that the relevant distinction is not between factual consent and legal consent, but between moral consent and legal consent, his essential claim that the law's understanding of consent is uniquely complex as compared to other relevant conceptions of consent survives.
All this is to say that Professor Westen's core distinction between factual consent and legal consent is, in my view, off the mark.
Given how persuasive Professor Westen is, however, in establishing that juries and judges standardly confuse factual consent with legal consent, I would much prefer to alter our discourse so as never to use the term "consent" in circumstances in which it does not connote that one has, in fact, given another a right to do what was formerly wrong.
"We are looking at what assistance the council could potentially give in terms of getting it reopened, but there are a number of complex legal consents that would have to be granted in order for this to happen, and it is too early to say if this will be possible."
This transaction is subject to 30 days no-shop clause and certain conditions, including satisfactory completion of financial due diligence and obtaining certain legal consents.
These modifications took effect in late November following the receipt of all the necessary legal consents.Following the Executive Board's discussion, Mr.
Because the city was concerned that TCI might use these facilities for purposes other than those permitted in TCI's cable franchise, the condition on the permits precluded the use of the facilities for telecommunications until TCI obtained any needed legal consents to provide such service (i.e., TCI needed to comply with existing law before using the facilities to provide telecommunications service).