causality

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causality

 [kaw-zal´ĭ-te]
the relationship between cause and effect.

cau·sal·i·ty

(kawz'al-i-tē),
The relating of causes to the effects they produce; the pathogenesis of disease and epidemiology, are largely concerned with causality.

causality

[kôsal′itē]
(in research) a relationship between one phenomenon or event (A) and another (B) in which A precedes and causes B. The direction of influence and the nature of the effect are predictable and reproducible and may be empirically observed. Causality is difficult to prove. Some social scientists contend that it is impossible to prove a causal relationship.

cau·sal·i·ty

(kaw-zali-tē)
The relating of causes to the effects they produce; the pathogenesis of disease and epidemiology are largely concerned with causality.

locus of causality

(1) in attribution theory, a person's perception of whether the cause of their success or failure at a task is internal (due to personal factors, such as effort and ability) or external (due to external factors, such as luck or chance); (2) in self-determination theory, a person's perception of whether the origin of their reasons for engaging in a behaviour is internal (done willingly and out of free choice) or external (done because they are compelled or required to do so, either by external pressure from others or because of self-imposed pressures).

cau·sal·i·ty

(kaw-zali-tē)
The relating of causes to the effects they produce; the pathogenesis of disease and epidemiology are largely concerned with causality.

causality,

n a relationship between one event or action that precedes and initiates a second action or influences the direction, nature, or force of a second action. In scientific study, causality must be observable, predictable, and reproducible and thus is difficult to prove.

causality

the relationship between cause and effects.

principle of causality
the postulate that every phenomenon has a cause or causes, i.e. that events do not occur at random but in accordance with physical laws so that, in principle, causes can be found for each effect.

Patient discussion about causality

Q. how is depression caused by having cancer treated? I mean not only the patient, also the family members who tend to get depressed by the situation. how can you treat thi skind of depression?

A. thanks guys, you are great. Nice to have such a community here.

Q. What causes fibromyalgia? Is fibromyalgia a deadly disease?

A. The causes of fibromyalgia are not known. But there are many theories such as abnormalities in brain chemicals, infections, trauma, genetics and hormonal changes. Factors such as poor sleep, fatigue, overexertion and anxiety, may aggravate the symptoms. Fibromyalgia is not a progressive or life-threatening condition, but it affects quality of life. Fibromyalgia is only a disorder of muscles and not a disease.

Q. Is that true that mouth sores are caused by lack of vitamins? I’ve been having white mouth sores in the past 6 months or so. Could that mean I have to take vitamin supplements?

A. yup ... autoimmune reactions means your immune system is not working well
it's not working well because it lacks the nutrient and vitamins it needs to function properly
- take lots of vitamin c to boost your immune system
- organic multivitamins
- organic juices high in anti oxidants
- and most important .. omega 3-6-9

More discussions about causality
References in periodicals archive ?
If, however, the greater weight of the evidence shows that (claimant) and [(defendant)] [one or more of (defendants)] [and] [(identify additional person(s) or entit(y)(ies))] were [negligent] [at fault] and that the [negligence] [fault] of each contributed as a legal cause of [loss] [injury] [or] [damage] sustained by (claimant), you should decide and write on the verdict form what percentage of the total [negligence] [fault] of [both] [all] parties to this action [and] [(identify additional person(s) or entit(y)(ies))] [begin strikethrough]is chargeable to[end strikethrough] was caused by each of them.
whether (driver), while operating a vehicle owned by (claimant) *[with [his] [her] consent, express or implied,] was [himself] [herself] negligent in the operation of the vehicle and, if so, whether that negligence was a contributing legal cause of the injury or damage to (claimant).
whether (defendant) was negligent in (describe alleged negligence) which caused (the product) to be unreasonably dangerous, and, if so, whether that unreasonably dangerous condition was a legal cause of the [loss] [injury] [or] [damage] to (claimant, decedent, or person for whose injury claim is made).
whether (defendant) was negligent in maintaining or in failing to protect (claimant child) from the (describe structure or other artificial condition) on the land or premises in question; and, if so, whether that negligence was a legal cause of the [loss] [injury] [or] [damage] to (claimant, decedent or person for whose injury claim is made).
To the contrary, they have argued that the segregation of legal cause and damages in crashworthiness cases is the most equitable division of liability because "the concept of 'enhanced injury' effectively apportions fault and damages on a comparative basis; defendant is liable only for the increased injury resulting from the crash itself.
He expands on non-causal analogy, the epistemology of the legal cause (especially whether appropriateness or effectiveness should be preferred), and formal methods such as consistency and convertibility.
Is a legal cause of action for a wrongful act perpetrated by a class of wrongdoers.
Deval Patrick may not have any legal cause to remove Mr.
The appellate court cited Wisconsin law holding that an accrued legal cause of action is a vested property right.
It shows no discernible legal cause of action whatsoever and is utterly without merit in fact or law.
8 Each of these items can relate to one, two, or all of the following issues: whether the product is defective, legal cause, and/or contributory fault by the plaintiff.
12 Legal Cause (general negligence); Florida Standard Jury Inst.