case law

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com·mon law

(kom'ŏn law)
A system of law based on custom, tradition, and court decisions rather than on written legislation.

case law

Opinions or decisions made by the courts.
See also: law
References in periodicals archive ?
Conclusion: Road traffic injuries are one of the foremost causes of medico legal cases followed by blunt trauma and sharp weapon injuries.
Loosely chronological, each chapter is organized around a legal case that illuminates aspects of the city's ambivalent relationship with a variety of forms of commercial sexual exchange, most obviously prostitution, but concert halls (with their scantily clad beer jerkers) and concubinage as well.
About 7,000 legal cases heard by Missouri's highest court from 1783 to 1871 are available on the Missouri secretory of state's Web site, www.
Dr Rob Patterson is the entrepreneur behind Elan Medical Services, which has a national database of medical experts ready and waiting to give their opinion in all sorts of legal cases.
The issue of men's reproductive rights occasionally surfaces in largely symbolic legal cases.
With the rise of electronic discovery requests in legal cases and government compliance issues, the ability for companies to protect mission-critical data, and at the same time comply with the law, makes this process even more difficult.
Although actual enforcement of these laws is rare, the statutes are often cited to the detriment of gay men and lesbians in legal cases on issues that include employment, custody, and marriage.
of 96 medical charts of 86 abused women who, together, made a total of 772 visits to two Boston hospitals, revealed that poorly documented medical records resulting from misconceptions between the legal and medical communities could hurt abused women's legal cases.
In addition, Americans United has won legal cases against government display of the Ten Commandments in Charleston, S.
As the records of Congressional debates on the Civil Rights Act of 1866 and the Fourteenth Amendment show--as do a handful of late-nineteenth-century legal cases that effectively dismantled the civil rights agenda legislatively enacted during the decade 1865-1875--the so-called "equality" of emancipated slaves was tenuous and vastly compromised within a violent, racist, and fiercely exclusive society.
Published weekly, it provides late-breaking information on key state and federal health policy legislative and regulatory issues, legal cases and health trends of interest to hospital, health system and physician group leaders in California.
Yet the confusing collection of acronyms and initialisms, legal cases, terminology, and new legal risks makes the area a potential minefield.