burden of proof

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burden of proof

A UK term of art used in fitness to practice proceedings, which places the onus (burden) on the prosecution to prove their case.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mark Rigby, chief executive of CVS, said: "It is the only tax not related to the ability to pay, so it places both a disproportionate financial and legal burden on sole traders."
I'm not sure if we are struggling with semantic murkiness, but my sense is that you want to endorse what I described in paragraph 5 in my previous email: there can be no legal burden of proof in a refugee claim.
* The legal burden could be passed on to the technology vendor,
Under the Texas Religious Freedom Restoration Act, any legal burden on the practice of religion must be "the least restrictive means" of serving a "compelling government interest." Judge Solis decided the Dallas ordinance did not meet that standard.
In an effort to place some of the legal burden on industry and bank partners, PPATK and the Central Bank work closely with educational institutions throughout Indonesia to develop financial expertise and responsibility among banking and industry in Indonesia.
"This legal burden of proof supersedes review of the present plans."
While the legal burden is on the employee to make the request, managers should be alert to the conversation.
The decision lightens the premier's legal burden; however Berlusconi still faces three active trials in Milan, on charges including corruption, tax fraud and accusations that he paid for sex with an underage Moroccan teen.
So signing the convention would not put additional legal burden on its shoulders.
One of its most dramatic effects would be to put the legal burden of proof on anyone challenging state liquor laws, which is not the case now.
The courts may even reject nuisance claims on the basis of defenses not yet argued--particularly the inability of plaintiffs to meet the legal burden of proof for causation.
In early cases, s 51A(2) was interpreted as imposing the legal burden of establishing reasonable grounds on the representor.