subclavian artery

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Related to Left subclavian artery: aorta, Left common carotid artery

sub·cla·vi·an ar·ter·y

[TA]
origin, right from brachiocephalic, left from arch of aorta; branches, vertebral, thyrocervical trunk, internal thoracic; costocervical trunk, descending scapular; it continues as the axillary artery after crossing the first rib.
Synonym(s): arteria subclavia [TA]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

subclavian artery

n.
A part of a major artery of the upper extremities or forelimbs that passes beneath the clavicle and is continuous with the axillary artery.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sub·cla·vi·an ar·te·ry

(sŭb-klā'vē-ăn ahr'tĕr-ē) [TA]
Origin, right from brachiocephalic, left from arch of aorta; branches, vertebral, thyrocervical trunk, internal thoracic; costocervical trunk, descending scapular; it continues as the axillary artery after crossing the first rib.
Synonym(s): arteria subclavia [TA] .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

subclavian artery

A short length of the major artery that branches from the aorta on the left side and from the innominate artery on the right side and continues as the axillary artery to supply the arm. The subclavian arteries also supply the brain via their vertebral branches.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(a) The initial segment of the isolated LCCA may represent a patent left ductus arteriosus at an abnormal position, while the fibrous band may represent the atretic left aortic arch segment between the LCCA and the left subclavian artery. (b) The fibrous band may represent the remnant of the left ductus arteriosus.
Our patient had a fusiform aneurysm in the proximal aspect of the left subclavian artery. No calcified plaques were present in the aortic arc, its proximal branches, or the cervical arteries.
In Meldrum-Hanna and colleagues' [6] series of 8 patients, they encountered the complications related to transaortic IABP including graft infection, aberrant cannulation of the left subclavian artery, left coronary artery embolism, and inability to close the sternum due to mechanical tamponade.
The criteria for endovascular repair include at least 15 mm distance between the aneurysm and the origin of the left subclavian artery or celiac artery (Figure 8); maximum aortic diameter in landing zone of 4 cm; and absence of thrombus or atheroma in the landing zone [14].
This will preclude the subclavian steal phenomenon from occurring so as to perfuse the left subclavian artery; consequently, surgical re-implantation of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery would be mandatory.
A CT angiogram showed complete occlusion of her left subclavian artery about 2 cm above its origin and occlusion of her left vertebral artery from its origin to the C5-C6 level.
This diverticulum is in fact a dilation of the origin of the aberrant left subclavian artery. Both types of vascular ring--the double aortic arch and the right aortic arch with an aberrant left subclavian artery--can have the same appearance on chest x-ray and barium esophagography.
Left subclavian artery diameter was 15 mm, therefore chimney grafting was considered ineligible due to high risk of proximal endoleak.
The innominate artery (IA), left carotid artery (LCA), and left subclavian artery (LSCA) were mobilized.
This case was related to an right subclavian artery, also anomalous, because it stemmed from the aortic arch, to the left of the left subclavian artery, presenting in addition a retrotracheal and retroesophageal course.
Coronary subclavian steal syndrome (CSSS), first described in 1974, is characterized by a stenotic proximal left subclavian artery (SA) causing reversal of flow in the LIMA resulting in a "steal" phenomenon [1].
Postoperative radiographs revealed malpositioning of the Knowles pin [Figure 2]b, with intimal dissection of the left subclavian artery and high-grade stenosis [6] evident on computed tomography angiography [Figure 3].