left gastric artery

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left gas·tric ar·ter·y

[TA]
origin, celiac; distribution, cardia of stomach at lesser curvature, abdominal part of the esophagus, and, frequently, a portion of the left lobe of the liver via an aberrant left hepatic branch; anastomoses, esophageal, right gastric.

left gas·tric ar·te·ry

(left gas'trik ahr'tĕr-ē) [TA]
Origin, celiac; distribution, cardia of stomach at lesser curvature, abdominal part of the esophagus, and frequently a portion of the left lobe of the liver through an aberrant left hepatic branch; anastomoses, esophageal, right gastric.

left gastric artery

A branch of the celiac artery that runs along the lesser curvature of the stomach, to which it supplies blood; its esophageal branches supply blood to the esophagus below the diaphragm.
See: circulation (Circulation of blood through heart and major vessels) for illus.
See also: artery
References in periodicals archive ?
We found that the Left gastric artery originated from the abdominal aorta rather than from the coeliac trunk in 2% of our cadavers.
Once normal studies are obtained, the procedure is performed using standard left gastric artery catheterization techniques with microcatheter sub-selection for the actual embolization.
They combed electronic medical records looking for patients who had undergone a left gastric embolisation procedure to stanch gastric haemorrhage, and for a comparison group of patients who had undergone another embolisation procedure of a different artery for the same complaint.
Measurement of the length of the coeliac trunk up to the left gastric, Measurement of the length of coeliac trunk up to common hepatic and/or splenic artery, Measurement of coeliac trunk diameter, Distance between coeliac trunk and the superior mesenteric artery shows in Table 1 (Figure 1 & 2).
There are reports of celiac trunk dividing into four branches, with an extra branch named as 'dorsal pancreatic artery' in addition to the usual three branches namely left gastric, hepatic and the splenic arteries (Karakose et al.
4-cm ruptured pseudoaneurysm of the left gastric artery within a large pancreatic pseudocyst (Figure 2).
The classic branching pattern in which the left gastric artery originates as the first branch and the coeliac trunk divides into common hepatic and splenic arteries.
The obtained results allowed us to conclude the following: 1) Mensuration of the length from the celiac trunk up to its first branch, the left gastric and/or splenic artery in 81 cadavers with a mean length of 1.
The coeliac trunk, the chief arterial supply for the foregut derivatives and one of the ventral branches of the abdominal aorta, usually gives origin to three branches, namely the splenic artery, the common hepatic artery and the left gastric artery.
In normal situations, this artery gives off three branches: the splenic artery, the left gastric artery and the common hepatic artery.
1) Its branches are left gastric artery, common hepatic artery and splenic artery which supply primary organs of supracolic compartments.