neurolinguistics

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neu·ro·lin·guis·tics

(nū'rō-ling-gwis'tiks),
The branch of medical science concerned with the neurogenic basis of speech and its disorders.

neurolinguistics

[noor′ō·ling·gwis′tiks]
Etymology: Gk, neuron + L, lingua, tongue
the study of language acquisition, processing, and production at the neurological level.

neurolinguistic programming

Alternative psychology
A behaviour modification technique developed in 1975 by Richard Bandler and John Grinder, which is based on a reciprocal relationship said to exist between a person’s behaviour and the external manifestations of his or her personality, including vocal tone, posture, eye movements and physiology.

neu·ro·lin·guis·tics

(nūr'ō-ling-gwis'tiks)
Clinical science centered on human brain mechanisms underlying the comprehension, production, and abstract knowledge of language.
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In the 2007 New Zealand Curriculum, a learning area devoted to Learning Languages was added to the existing seven areas identified in the 1993 New Zealand Curriculum Framework.
In his commentary on how successful learning languages in New Zealand can be, East (2007) surveys and compares the strategies of the UK government and the New Zealand government with regard to increasing the rate of language learning in their respective education systems.
In conclusion, Teaching and Learning Languages has much to offer the second-language teacher in ESL or otherwise who wishes to delve into a topic of interest or to explore new ground.
He considers age six to be the prime time for learning languages, as children possess strong learning abilities and are able to achieve fluency at such an age.
Our main aim is to generate a love for learning languages," he added.
Yours magazine commissioned the research in a poll of 2,000 readers and found grannies today were more likely to be travelling the world, learning languages, enjoying nights out and making love than sitting by the fire knitting.
Polansky (2004), who reports on a project that engaged undergraduates in tutoring pupils learning languages at elementary, middle, and high school levels, warns that information must be provided about "the student's proficiency level, performance, diligence, and general suitability for this experience" (p.
He added: 'There is a need to arrest and reverse the downward trend in the numbers of youngsters learning languages post 14.
Students learning languages now are better able to see the need to study that language.
Learning languages has become a hobby for the TV writer and producer.
For me, learning a language that is spoken right here in our own country has been of far more use than learning languages that are spoken far away.
Europeans are so good at learning languages and they just love to try out their English.

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