neurolinguistics

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neu·ro·lin·guis·tics

(nū'rō-ling-gwis'tiks),
The branch of medical science concerned with the neurogenic basis of speech and its disorders.

neurolinguistics

[noor′ō·ling·gwis′tiks]
Etymology: Gk, neuron + L, lingua, tongue
the study of language acquisition, processing, and production at the neurological level.

neurolinguistic programming

Alternative psychology
A behaviour modification technique developed in 1975 by Richard Bandler and John Grinder, which is based on a reciprocal relationship said to exist between a person’s behaviour and the external manifestations of his or her personality, including vocal tone, posture, eye movements and physiology.

neu·ro·lin·guis·tics

(nūr'ō-ling-gwis'tiks)
Clinical science centered on human brain mechanisms underlying the comprehension, production, and abstract knowledge of language.
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35 The striking contradictory point here is that they all had been learning language since their childhood.
Overall mean score on affective strategies of language learning shows that both types of students use same types of strategies while learning language.
In conclusion, Teaching and Learning Languages has much to offer the second-language teacher in ESL or otherwise who wishes to delve into a topic of interest or to explore new ground.
Saudi educators encourage learning languages at a young age, saying children have a unique ability to acquire language skills and build first-rate verbal processing skills.
Collaboration between business, education and public authorities to promote learning languages as a means toward economic development will be at the centre of a forum organised on 19 November in Lisbon by the European Commission.
Cathy said: "It's a national celebration of learning languages.
If you look at effective ways of learning languages, more intense periods of learning are proven to be more successful,'' said Barry Gribbins, the college's vice president of institutional development.
Our main aim is to generate a love for learning languages," he added.
Yours magazine commissioned the research in a poll of 2,000 readers and found grannies today were more likely to be travelling the world, learning languages, enjoying nights out and making love than sitting by the fire knitting.
Polansky (2004), who reports on a project that engaged undergraduates in tutoring pupils learning languages at elementary, middle, and high school levels, warns that information must be provided about "the student's proficiency level, performance, diligence, and general suitability for this experience" (p.
He added: 'There is a need to arrest and reverse the downward trend in the numbers of youngsters learning languages post 14.
Students learning languages now are better able to see the need to study that language.

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