learning curve

(redirected from Learning curves)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

learning curve

a graphic presentation of the effects of a specified method of teaching or training on the ability of a subject to learn, as shown by improved performance in a particular task.

learning curve

A negative deviation in a desired or anticipated outcome or result, which rises toward a (desired) norm as experience with the activity of interest accumulates.

learning curve

The effect of learning or practice on the performance of an intellectual or physical task. The term describes the acquisition of competence with experience, time, and training.
See also: curve
References in periodicals archive ?
The primary outcome of this study was the impact of case timing in the learning curve on margin status.
Boeing uses learning curves for capacity analysis, resource requirements planning, cost-reduction proposals and estimations of production-line performance.
This provides a good analogy for modeling learning curves with the recognition of increasing performance or decreasing cost with respect to the passage of time.
Abstract--A learning curve analysis is applied to model the change in effort units with time by the commercial fishery for Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in the Barents Sea.
Two different learning curves for the same task are depicted in Figure 2.
We've been very impressed with the advanced skill sets and steep learning curves the students have brought to the team," said Markus Nitschke, Attachmate vice president of corporate marketing.
The five-volume Learning Curves series is designed to provide financial professionals with comprehensive analyses of the latest derivatives products, models and markets.
This will reduce learning curves and enable more users to access the power and productivity offered by XPP.
Trivantis' Lectora authoring and publishing tools combine near-zero learning curves with industry leading capabilities.
SolidWorks has set the standard for 3D design software, eliminating tedious learning curves and freeing students to spend more of their class time developing the skills they'll need in their professional careers," said Rosanne Kramer, director of worldwide education markets for SolidWorks.

Full browser ?