LeFort fracture

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LeFort fracture

Orthopedics A bilateral fracture of the maxilla, which is divided into 3 types, defined by R LeFort in 1901
LeFort fractures  
I  Dentoalveolar dysjunction Fracture lines are transverse through the pyriform aperature above the alveolar ridge and pass posteriorly to the pterygoid region; the diagnosis is suggested by lip lacerations, clinical malocclusion, mobility of the fractures bone when the examiner moves the incisor teeth
II Pyramidal fracture Superior fracture lines are transverse through the nasal bone and/or maxillary articulation; diagnosis is suggested by free mobility of anterior maxilla
III Craniofacial dysjunction Central third of face is separated from base of skull; diagnosis is suggested by major facial edema, ecchymosis, and facile mobility of middle third of face by examiner; LeFort III is the most severe midfacial fracture, and may require open reduction and internal fixation Sabiston, Ed, Textbook of Surgery, 14 th ed, WB Saunders, 1991  
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

LeFort fracture

A fracture usually involving more than one of the facial bones: maxillary, nasal, orbital, and/or zygomatic.
Synonym: mid-face fracture
See also: fracture
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Zygomatic and lefort fractures accounted for most of the isolated midfacial fractures which is in accordance with previous studies conducted in Lahore and international studies but it is in contrast with a regional study conducted in Rawalpindi, Pakistan.8,10 Our study evidences that the fractures of the zygomatic complex were frequently observed among patients injured due to RTA.
Among lefort fractures, lefort II fractures were the most prevalent type followed by lefort I and lefort III.
Oral intubation per se interferes with checking the dental occlusion, while nasotracheal intubation is usually contraindicated in the presence of nasal bone fractures present in isolation or as a component of LeFort fractures. (8,9) Conventional tracheostomy which is an alternative in these situations has many short-term and long-term complications like haemorrhage, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastinum, recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, tracheal stenosis, tracheomalacia, etc.
Lefort fractures of midface were recorded in 23 cases (9.7%) and zygomaticomaxillary fractures were seen in 17 patients (7.1%) in the current study.
Nasotracheal intubation was clearly contraindicated because of Lefort fractures. Oral intubation was precluded because of surgical prerequisite of checking dental occlusion.