laity

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laity

[lā′itē]
Etymology: Gk, laikos, of the people
a nonprofessional segment of the population, as viewed from the perspective of a member of a particular profession. A clergyman may regard a physician as a member of the laity and vice versa.

laity

(lā′ĭ-tē) [Gr. laos, the people]
Individuals who are not members of a particular profession such as law, dentistry, medicine, or the ministry.
References in periodicals archive ?
The rationale of this study is to evaluate the impact of treatment on oral health related-quality of life and to estimate facial appearance change after the construction of removable dentures by patients, lay persons and dentists.
Lay persons often commit all sorts of offenses, like road rage on the highways; they forget to demonstrate patience, and maintain law and order - just because of some trigger-quick reaction that pushed their anger button.
Aimed more at those studying the subject rather than the lay person.
Some of his rules of thumb were: provide the context; be selective -- it is easy to drown the lay person in facts; adjust the message to the audience; humor is a great way gain attention and increase memorability.
The research is solid and factually correct, but it is condensed and easy for a lay person to read and understand.
The lay person would likely find much of the information and terminology daunting and confusing.
A Fire in the Bones is an excellent primer for the lay person in African American religious history; it is accessible, informative, and comprehensive.
The contents are further enhanced by over 100 illustrations which serve to highlight the advice provided and help the lay person to better undestand the subject matter.
This is an ingenious book for the intelligent lay person.
It is important that the expert be able to explain even complex issues to a lay person.
In short, the lay person may provide the link between the technical clinical world and the ordinary outside world.
This book will be interesting to researchers, professionals working in rehab and families and the individuals who have suffered brain injury, however the personal narrative will also appeal to the lay person.