contract

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Related to Law of contracts: Law of torts

con·tract

(kon-trakt'),
1. To shorten; to become reduced in size; in the case of muscle, either to shorten or to undergo an increase in tension.
2. To acquire by contagion or infection.
3. An explicit bilateral commitment by psychotherapist and patient to a defined course of action to attain the goal of the psychotherapy.
[L. con-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw together]

contract

/con·tract/ (kon-trakt´)
1. to shorten, or reduce in size, as a muscle.
2. to acquire or incur.

contract

(kən-trăkt′, kŏn′trăkt′)
v.
1. To reduce in size by drawing together; shrink.
2. To become reduced in size by or as if by being drawn together, as the pupil of the eye.
3. To acquire or incur by contagion or infection.

contract

Etymology: L, con + trahere, to draw
1 n, [kon′trakt] , an agreement or a promise that meets certain legal requirements, including competence of both or all parties to make the contract, proper lawful subject matter, mutuality of agreement, mutuality of obligation, and consideration (the exchange of something of value in payment for the obligation undertaken).
2 v, [kəntrakt′] , to make such an agreement or promise. contractual, adj.

contract

A written, dated and signed agreement between two or more parties, which sets out any arrangements on delegation and distribution of tasks and obligations, and, if appropriate, on financial matters. A clinical trial protocol may serve as the basis for a contract.

contract

Managed care A health care policy or plan in which a provider offers certain services delineated in writing, to which the purchaser–Pt agrees by signature. See Guaranteed renewable contract, Provider risk contract, Subscriber contract.

con·tract

(kon'trakt, kŏn-trakt')
1. To shorten; to become reduced in size; in the case of muscle, either to shorten or to undergo an increase in tension.
2. To acquire by contagion or infection.
3. An explicit bilateral commitment by psychotherapist and patient to a defined course of action to attain the goal of the psychotherapy.
[L. con-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw together]

con·tract

(kon'trakt, kŏn-trakt')
1. Explicit bilateral commitment by dentist and patient to a defined course of action to attain the goal of therapy.
2. To acquire by contagion or infection.
3. To shorten; to become reduced in size.
[L. con-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw together]
References in periodicals archive ?
ANSON, PRINCIPLES OF THE ENGLISH LAW OF CONTRACT AND OF AGENCY AND ITS RELATION TO CONTRACT, at ix-xiv (J.
MCBRYDE, THE LAW OF CONTRACT IN SCOTLAND 355-56 (3d ed.
While the focus here is mainly on the structure revealed by the headings used in setting out the law of contract, as Lubbe points out, there is a broader, and at times more latent, structural relationship between specific concepts and institutions.
KERR, THE PRINCIPLES OF THE LAW OF CONTRACT (1967)) ("[W]hile there is room for many schemes for a book on contract, I do feel that some aspects of the scheme adopted by Mr.
BRADFIELD, CHRISTIE'S THE LAW OF CONTRACT IN SOUTH AFRICA 327 (6th ed.
FURMSTON, CHESHIRE FIFOOT AND FURMSTON'S LAW OF CONTRACT 284-85 (15th ed.
Lubbe, The Law of Contract in South Africa by RH Christie, 1981 ACTA JURIDICA 177, 179 ("It requires a careful reading.
ALISTAIR KERR, THE PRINCIPLES OF THE LAW OF CONTRACT 421 (6th ed.
Christie, who was the sole author of all but the latest edition of Christie's Law of Contract in South Africa, was born and raised in England, and studied law at Trinity Hall, Cambridge from 1946-1949, where he did, however, enjoy some exposure to Roman-Dutch law.

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