second law of thermodynamics

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sec·ond law of ther·mo·dy·nam·ics

the entropy of the universe moves toward a maximum; similarly, the entropy of any isolated microcosm (for example, a chemical reaction) proceeds spontaneously only in that direction that yields an increase in entropy, entropy being maximal at equilibrium. To quote G.N. Lewis, "Every process that occurs spontaneously is capable of doing work; to reverse any such process requires the expenditure of work from the outside."
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second law of thermodynamics

see THERMODYNAMICS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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What had struck everyone, when the law of entropy was discovered by thermodynamics, was its cosmic consequences; it meant the sun would eventually become cold.
Beyond this, Arthur Eddington has related entropy to beauty and melody: 'Entropy is only found when the parts are viewed in association, and it is by viewing or hearing the parts in association that beauty and melody are discerned'.[4] The trouble with this all too broad statement is that thermodynamics in its general sense, as Max Planck has reminded us, 'knows nothing of an atomic structure and regards all substances as absolutely continuous'.[5] The law of entropy, being purely statistical, ignores precisely the characteristics of structure, which creates form.[6] Equilibrium, a special manifestation of entropy, does refer to structure, but in a onesided fashion.
Had other scientific theories been named by their detractors the law of entropy might be called the "Big Downer," information theory "Number Play," and economics "Dismal Science."