guardian

(redirected from Law Guardian)
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(1) A person authorised under applicable state or local law to give permission on behalf of a child for general medical care
(2) A person, usually an attorney, who is appointed by the court to represent the best interests of a child or persons of 'diminished capacity'

guardian

Guardian ad litem, law guardian Social medicine A person authorized under applicable state or local law to give permission on behalf of a child to general medical care; a person, usually an attorney who is appointed by the court to represent the best interests of a child or other person of “diminished capacity”. Guardianship. Cf Emancipated minor.

guard·i·an

(gahr'dē-ăn)
An adult (appointed by a court) who is considered legally responsible for the care and custody of a minor or another adult determined to be unable to provide self-care or otherwise in competent by a physician or jurist.

guard·i·an

(gahr'dē-ăn)
An adult considered legally responsible for the care and custody of a minor or another adult determined to be unable to provide self-care.

guardian,

n a person appointed to take care of the person or property of another; one who legally has the care and management of the person or the property or both of a child until the child attains adulthood.
References in periodicals archive ?
77) After the statutory establishment of the right to compensation for law guardians of minors who were subjects of certain family court proceedings, there was confusion and lack of uniformity about appointing law guardians in similar types of proceedings in the supreme court.
For one case, in which a thirteen-year-old girl was raped by a man who turned out to be a poor law guardian from another union, see South Dublin Union Board of Guardians Minute Books, 7 Nov.
If this did not happen, the Poor Law guardians arranged a burial which usually took place in a local cemetery or burial ground.
Law guardians and forensics specialists, whose qualifications and responsibilities are not regulated;
That was another year of communal violence in the city, the culmination of a sustained campaign of sectarian agitation which had started in 1932, almost as soon as the Belfast Unemployed Workers' committee, a rare alliance of working-class Catholics and Protestants, had compelled the Board of Poor Law Guardians to improve wages and working conditions of men on out-door-relief work schemes.
At the end of the 18th century the Birmingham Poor Law guardians set up an Asylum for the Infant Poor on what we would now call New Town Row.
They were the youngsters who were sent to the Ponteland Cottage Homes, which were built by the Poor Law Guardians of Newcastle in 1903 in what was then a relatively remote part of the Northumbrian countryside.