guardian

(redirected from Law Guardian)
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(1) A person authorised under applicable state or local law to give permission on behalf of a child for general medical care
(2) A person, usually an attorney, who is appointed by the court to represent the best interests of a child or persons of 'diminished capacity'
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

guardian

Guardian ad litem, law guardian Social medicine A person authorized under applicable state or local law to give permission on behalf of a child to general medical care; a person, usually an attorney who is appointed by the court to represent the best interests of a child or other person of “diminished capacity”. Guardianship. Cf Emancipated minor.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

guard·i·an

(gahr'dē-ăn)
An adult (appointed by a court) who is considered legally responsible for the care and custody of a minor or another adult determined to be unable to provide self-care or otherwise in competent by a physician or jurist.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

guard·i·an

(gahr'dē-ăn)
An adult considered legally responsible for the care and custody of a minor or another adult determined to be unable to provide self-care.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(77) After the statutory establishment of the right to compensation for law guardians of minors who were subjects of certain family court proceedings, there was confusion and lack of uniformity about appointing law guardians in similar types of proceedings in the supreme court.
They were the youngsters who were sent to the Ponteland Cottage Homes, which were built by the Poor Law Guardians of Newcastle in 1903 in what was then a relatively remote part of the Northumbrian countryside.
But only after many years of dragging their feet did the Poor Law guardians stump up the considerable sum of pounds 160,000 for a replacement at Heath Town.
The building dates back to 1914, when it was built at the request of the Poor Law Guardians of Newcastle to accommodate children from the Cottage Homes at Kirkley, near Ponteland.
will depress the rate of wages, and in the long run, injure laborers intended to benefit." [29] But local poor law guardians found it cheaper to give outdoor relief to unemployed or underemployed men with families than to take them into the workhouse and break up their families.
Endemically reluctant to spend money, the authorities at Kings Norton - the Poor Law guardians - spent a generation trying to squeeze more and more patients into the old workhouse, and resist the increasingly vociferous calls by the Poor Law inspector to abandon it and build afresh elsewhere.
The Poor Law Guardians bought the hall in 1913 and it passed to the National Health Service in 1948.
Local government affected more directly the lives of the poor, unemployed, and the vote-less working class generally - and Boards of Poor Law Guardians.