Lavandula angustifolia


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Related to Lavandula angustifolia: Lavandula officinalis

lavender

(lav-uhn-der) ,

Lavandula angustifolia

(trade name),

alhucema

(trade name)

Classification

Therapeutic: hair regrowth stimulants
Alopecia areata.Depression.Insomnia.

Action

Lavender decreases EEG potentials and decreases alertness and seems to induce relaxation and sedation. Lavender's stimulant effect on hair growth is not fully understood.

Therapeutic effects

Improved hair growth.
Improved sleep.

Pharmacokinetics

Absorption: Unknown
Distribution: Unknown
Metabolism and Excretion: Unknown
Half-life: Unknown

Time/action profile

ONSETPEAKDURATION
PO, topicalunknownunknownunknown

Contraindications/Precautions

Contraindicated in: Hypersensitivity.Pregnancy.
Use Cautiously in: Children (topical use in prepubertal boys may result in gynecomastia).Discontinue use 2 weeks prior to elective surgical procedures (additive CNS depressant effects with anesthetic agents).

Adverse Reactions/Side Effects

Central nervous system

  • headache

Dermatologic

  • dermatitis (with topical use)

Gastrointestinal

  • constipation
  • increased appetite

Endocrinologic

  • gynecomastia (with topical use in prepubertal boys)

Interactions

Lavender can potentiate the therapeutics effects of barbiturates,chloral hydrate, andCNS depressants. None.
Oral (Adults) Depression–60 drops/day tincture of lavender (1:5 in 50% alcohol) for 4 weeks.
Topical (Adults) Alopecia areata—3 drops (108 mg) of lavender oil
Inhalation (Adults) Insomnia—vaporized lavender oil has been used as aromatherapy

Availability

Dried flower: Essential oil:

Nursing implications

Nursing assessment

  • Assess mood and sleep pattern periodically during therapy.
  • Lab Test Considerations: Monitor lipid levels and coagulation panel periodically during therapy.

Potential Nursing Diagnoses

Sleep deprivation (Indications)

Implementation

  • Oral: Diluted tincture may be taken in alcohol or tea.
  • Topical: Combine with other essential oils and massage into scalp nightly for 2 minutes with a warm towel around head to increase absorption.

Patient/Family Teaching

  • Instruct patient to dilute and take as directed. Undiluted essential oil of lavender may be poisonous if taken by mouth.
  • Instruct patient in correct technique for use for alopecia.
  • Advise female patient to notify health care professional if pregnancy is planned or suspected or if breastfeeding.

Evaluation/Desired Outcomes

  • Improvement in sleep pattern and mood.
  • Reduction of alopecia.
A perennial herb that contains coumarins—e.g., coumarin and umbelliferone, flavonoids, tannins, triterpenoids, and volatile oils. Lavender is said to have antibacterial, carminative and sedative effects
References in periodicals archive ?
The effects of aqueous extract of Lavandula angustifolia flowers in glutamate-induced neurotoxicity of cerebellar granular cell culture of rat pups.
Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oils of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and lavandin (Lavandula x intermedia) grown in Western Romania.
Going back to Lavandula angustifolia or what is also commonly known as "true lavender," it is known as an excellent essential oil for healing tissues.
The true lavenders (Lavandula angustifolia) you prune early in spring and throughout summer.
Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) is beginning to bloom, and the time to harvest the stalk is when a couple of flowers have opened, as the blue shows on buds.
There are lots of plants to attract them, such as, Lavandula angustifolia (English lavender), ribes (flowering currant), trifolium (clover) and fuchsia.
The collected plants were included of: Achillea wilhelmsii (leaf), Achillea millefolium (leaf), Artemisia dracunculus (leaf), Salvia multicaulis (leaf), Thymus vulgaris (leaf), Ziziphora clinopodioides (leaf), Rosmarinus officinalis (leaf), Lavandula angustifolia (leaf), Mentha piperata (leaf), Hyossopus officinalis (leaf), Salvia officinalis (leaf), Anethum graveolens (seed), Foeniculum vulgare (seed), Carum carvi (seed), Petroselinum sativum (seed), Artemisia absinthum and Melissa officinalis (leaf).
This study was designed to assess the olfactory impact of the essential oils of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and rosemary (Rosmarlnus officinalis) on cognitive performance and mood in healthy volunteers.
The 21 essential oils tested were: aniseed (Pimpinella anisum), calamus (Acorus calamus), camphor (Cinnamomuum camphora), cedarwood (Cedrus atlantica), cinnamon (Cinnamonuum zeylanicum), citronella (Cymbopogon nardus), clove (Eugenia caryophyllus), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus), geranium (Pelargonium graveolens), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), lemon (Citrus limon), lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus), lime (Citrus aurantium), nutmeg (Myristica fragrans), orange (Citrus sinensis), palmarosa (Cymbopogon martini), peppermint (Mentha piperita), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) basil (Ocimum sanctum), vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides) and wintergreen (Gaultheria fragrantissima).
The only likely environmental exposure was to a shampoo and a hair gel that he used every day, which was found to contain lavender oil (listed as Lavandula angustifolia on the label) and tea tree oil (listed as Melaleuca alternifolia).
There are literally dozens of varieties of edible flowers to be found in the Prairie garden, including those of Bee Balm (Monarda didyma), Borage (Borago officinalis), Pot Marigold (Calendula officinalis), Daylily (Hemerocallis spp.), Clove Pinks (Dianthus caryophyllus), Hollyhock (Althaea rosea), Japanese Honeysuckle vine (Lonicera japonica), Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia.), Lilac (Syringa vulgaris), Nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus), Pansy (Viola spp.), Rose (Rosa spp.), Tulip (Tulipa spp.) [Note: tulip bulbs are toxic.], and Violet (Viola odorata) among the most common.
Essential Oils for Relaxation: Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) "Roman Chamomile (Chamameleum nobile) Clary Sage (Salvia sclerea) Bergamot (Citrus aurantium ssp.