latitude

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latitude

 [lat´ĭ-tood]
the recording capability of x-ray film.
contrast latitude the ability of a film to record differences in density.
film latitude the ability of an emulsion to record a wide range of densities.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lat·i·tude

(la'ti-tūd),
The range of light or x-ray exposure acceptable with a given photographic emulsion. See: latitude film.
[L. latitudo, width, fr. latus, wide]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lat·i·tude

(lat'i-tūd)
The range of light or x-ray exposure acceptable with a given photographic emulsion.
[L. latitudo, width, fr. latus, wide]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lat·i·tude

(lat'i-tūd)
The range of light or x-ray exposure acceptable with a given photographic emulsion.
[L. latitudo, width, fr. latus, wide]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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The researchers compared these data with those obtained from fossil crocodile teeth found at the same locations or at similar latitudes. All the fossil teeth studied were about 75 million years old.
They have always had trouble simulating ice age conditions, because it has proved difficult to cool off the poles and midlatitudes while keeping the low latitudes at today's temperatures.