Latino


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Latino

(lah-tēn′ō)
1. Pert. to Latin-American language, culture, or ethnicity.
2. A person of Latin-American or Spanish-speaking ancestry.
References in periodicals archive ?
"One of the most frequent portrayals on screen involved stripping Latino characters of their culture or community.
Additionally, one in five Latinos said that they or a family member have experienced violence (20%) or threats or non-sexual harassment (19%) because they are Latino.
"From my perspective as a Latino professional, corporations understand the need to be able to diversify their workforce to emulate the communities in which they operate," Baral said.
* Are there other "wild card" factors that might influence the impact of the Latino vote?
With the shift in the nation's demographics, higher education is concerned with the academic success of Latinos. Not only is the federal government trying to address the issues of access and equity for underserved minorities' populations, but higher education plays a crucial role in reducing the educational gaps for Latinos.
It is the subtext, intertext and ubertext with which Latino Shakespeares continue to be in fraught dialogue today.
After providing a compelling context of the Latino Catholic experience, the final chapter, entitled "Passing on the Faith," is especially important for understanding the role of education in religious change.
Latinos are hardworking, but many are not running large, profitable businesses as yet.
The book takes the reader through an experiential sequence bringing them on a journey of the Latino. Beginning with the early history of Latinos in the U.S., she then provides an in-depth understanding of the new Latino and the value they bring to the U.S.
The Latino demographic is getting bigger, but the proportion of those who vote has hardly budged in 20 years, remaining in the 45 percent to 50 percent range.
Brady in Voice and Equality: Civic Voluntarism in American Politics (1995) as this model applies to Latino Catholics as a whole.
This text seeks to inform librarians of ways to make their services more relevant to Latino teens; however, the information proves basic and lacks innovation.