Latino


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Latino

(lah-tēn′ō)
1. Pert. to Latin-American language, culture, or ethnicity.
2. A person of Latin-American or Spanish-speaking ancestry.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the growing young Latino population, NLCI is transforming and will become the network center of communication on issues important to children and young Latinos.
Sarmiento presented Gibson with a plaque for ``spotlighting'' the Latino community in the movie.
Besides the services it provides in Latino neighborhoods, UNO is putting a new twist on community activism by providing leadership training to a Hispanic elite, some of whom have gone on to land city and state government jobs.
While there is some literature describing the specific needs of the Latino student population, only a few articles address consultation issues with Latino students and families.
Examining the role ethnicity has played in their careers, other Latino dance artists give voice to similar feelings, albeit in the registers of a complex chorus.
It would mean developing styles of prayer and liturgy that might operate in English but in which the religiosity underneath is still predominantly Latino.
College aspiration is high within the Latino community, but financial aid knowledge is the missing link," says Harry Pachon, president of TRPI.
Had it not been for these [characteristics of American color consciousness], would African Americans see and define themselves as a group of people of mixed ancestry, similar to the way many Latinos view themselves?
Diaz says the desire to escape oppression and family pressures often plays a bigger role in gay Latino immigration than any enticements of the mythically "fabulous" gay life here.
At the heart of his analysis is the belief that Latino immigration today is different than any immigration before it, and that the failure of Latinos in the United States to climb out of the ghetto at the rate earlier immigrants did is the result of forces beyond their control.
For years, many Americans have viewed Latinos as less than white and have enforced this perspective to exclude them from education, employment, political representation, and much else.
The percentages for non Latino whites or African Americans were nearly equal.