Latino

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Latino

(lah-tēn′ō)
1. Pert. to Latin-American language, culture, or ethnicity.
2. A person of Latin-American or Spanish-speaking ancestry.
References in periodicals archive ?
6 will receive an email with a link to the webinar, which will be available for a limited time only for Access Latina participants.
Over 70% of Latinas and Latina Millennials research online first then go in-store to buy.
The LATINA Style 50 Report is the most exhaustive study of corporate America's policies and opportunities for Latinas in the workplace," says Robert E.
As part of the Latina Summer Academy, Latina professionals in a variety of fields meet with the girls for conversation and Questions during lunches and a supper.
The series is the first mainstream, English-language television drama featuring five Latina main characters, which is -- for better or for worse -- a novel concept even in this day and age.
Today, P&G's Orgullosa program introduces the first-ever Board of Faldas (Board of Skirts), three strong Latina experts and professionals who will provide tips to celebrate, empower, and fuel Latinas' accomplishments and dreams.
We provide not only financial services that speed the flow of commerce and add convenience for individuals, but we also offer the extra help necessary to support Latina organizations and businesses such as The National Latina Business Women Association (Los Angeles Chapter) and the Women's Institute of Negotiation.
Over 20 percent of Latina women are uninsured, totaling over 1 million women.
Her first play, Love Struck, written with Marie Barrientos, is a passionate love story between two Latinas.
The National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health (NLIRH)'s mission is to address these issues and to safeguard the fundamental human right to reproductive health care for Latinas, their families, and their communities.
In February 2004, The Alan Guttmacher Institute (AGI) and the Latino Issues Forum (LIF) convened a meeting of health professionals, advocates and researchers to begin a discussion on improving policymaking, research and resources for Latina sexual and reproductive health nationwide.
While the New York Times ran a rare story from the perspective of Latina march participants ("Against Abortion but in Favor of Choice," Andrea Elliot, April 26, 2004), most mainstream media stories focused on abortion and the usual spokespeople for the cause.