binomial nomenclature

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nomenclature

 [no´men-kla″chur]
terminology; a classified system of technical names, such as of anatomical structures or organisms.
binomial nomenclature the nomenclature used in scientific classification of living organisms in which each organism is designated by two latinized names (genus and species), both of which must always be used because species names are not necessarily unique. note: The genus name is always capitalized, the species name is not, and both are italicized, e.g., Escherichia coli. When a name is repeated the genus name may be abbreviated by its initial, e.g., E. coli.

lin·nae·an sys·tem of no·men·cla·ture

the system of nomenclature in which the names of species are composed of two parts, a generic name and a specific epithet (species name, in botany).
[Carl von Linné]

binomial nomenclature

n.
The scientific naming of species whereby each species receives a Latin or Latinized name of two parts, the first indicating the genus and the second being the specific epithet. For example, Juglans regia is the English walnut; Juglans nigra, the black walnut.

binomial nomenclature

The naming convention for living organisms in which each organism is identified by 2 names: genus (e.g., Pneumocystis) and species (e.g., jiroveci).

bi·no·mi·al no·men·cla·ture

(bī-nō'mē-ăl nō'mĕn-klā'chŭr)
Naming system in which each species of animal or plant has a name composed of two terms, one identifying the genus to which it belongs and the second the species.

binomial nomenclature

in this the FOVEA, an area of acute vision, is of particular importance. Binocular vision results in a stereoscopic or 3-D effect, the slightly different positions of the two eyes being important in that they view the object from slightly different angles.

binomial nomenclature

the basis of the present scientific nomenclature of animals and plants, each of which is given a generic name followed by a specific name, in Greek, Latin or often Latinized English. The generic name invariably has an initial capital letter, and the specific name, even if it is the name of a person, an initial small letter, both names being in italics, or underlined. Thus the robin is named Erithacus rubecula. All scientific names used before the publication of the 10th edition of LINNAEUS'S Systema Naturae (1758) are no longer applicable, and the names given since then have priority by date as a rule, the earliest name for an organism being given preference over others. Often the scientific name is followed by the name of the person allocating the name and the date, e.g. Erithacus rubecula (L.) 1766. L. is an abbreviation for Linnaeus, and the brackets indicate a change from the genus in which he originally placed it; where genera and species are redefined, change of generic name is allowable. The robin was originally named Motacilla rubecula L. 1766. Motacilla is now the genus including wagtails, a group not closely related to robins which were subsequently placed in the genus Erithacus.
References in periodicals archive ?
And it's now clear that it's not an Aldabra tortoise but a South American species that has its own Latin name. In the end, Bour concluded that applying the rules of the code would not call for naming the Aldabra tortoise gigantea.
The use of Latin names for plants is common throughout the world and can reveal a lot about the plant you are buying in its infancy, such as what colour it will be, the shape of its leaves and other distinguishing features.
I assume the inquiry has to do with the Latin name? "Castanea" is a Latin word for "chestnut," and that is plain enough.
The book includes a fact file chart (Latin name, common name and location for over 80 different cetaceans), an index and a few suggestions for further reading.
The rules also allow dietary supplement product labels to omit the Latin binomial of herbal ingredients listed in Herbs of Commerce, 2nd edition, whereas the Latin name is required to identify all other herbal ingredients.
The caps- part comes from the Latin name for the peppers, capsicum, and -rubin means red.
The bird, whose Latin name is Calypte anna, began setting up housekeeping several weeks ago, making a nest from spider webs and lichen, and lining it with feathers and animal hair.
He was born at Montopoli in the Sabine country, near the old abbey of Farfa, some time in the period 1420-25 (whence his Latin name, Petrus Odus Montopolitanus).
To be valid, all of the following steps must be completed: a name must be published in a scientific journal, the name must be a binary Latin name, the organism must be described in Latin, the rank of the organism must be indicated, and the new species must be called by the term "typus or holotypus," and the specimen or microscope slides must be placed in a public holding (details are available from: URL: http:// www.bgbm.fu-berlin.de/iapt/nomenclature/code/SaintLouis/0000St.Luistitle.htm).