LATIN

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Related to Latin language: Latin alphabet, Greek language
Lipid Assessment Trial in an Italian Network. A trial designed to assess the variation in total serum cholesterol during the course of MI with respect to infarct size and C-reactive protein level
Conclusion Variations in total serum cholesterol were more pronounced in patients with larger infarcts
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the case of <i> and <u>, this seems to have more to do with the influence of modern Italian on Latin than with any precedent in the Latin language itself.
"There are many Latin language learners," he wrote.
--John Bruss of Sewanee University (Tenn.), on the rise in Greek and Latin language studies.
GLAMOUR model Abi Titmuss and the Latin language are unlikely bedfellows but if comedian Alex Horne has his way they could all be sharing airtime before long.
Like Mel Gibson's soldiers, the Latin language seems to be preferred, yet not as historical research suggests.
The upgrade includes Latin language password support, faster encryption/ decryption, and support for the newest cryptographic tokens and smart cards, such as the Precise Biometric 250 MC, SafeNet 330, Sony Puppy, Aladdin eToken Pro and IBM JCOP 20.
Imperial Rome was finally extinguished in the fifth century A.D., and though strands of her culture persisted--in the Venetian Republic, in the Byzantine Empire, and in Western Christendom, which preferred the Latin language over the vernacular for the next thousand years--the books were closed on the civilization of Cicero, Brutus, and even the Caesars.
Doctors use many words from the Latin language. The Latin word for "bones" is ossa.
Significantly, in their Latin language, "school" or ludus came from "training exercises for war"; thus, the descendants of these classrooms teach that knowledge is "conceived of as a metaphorical battle" (258-259).
In the "On the Net" column, LeLoup and Ponteiro profile several Internet-based interactive language grammar and pronunciation activities for Spanish, French, German, Italian, Vietnamese, Chinese, and Latin language learners.
"Consciousness of the Latin Language among Humanists: Did the Romans Speak Latin?" examines a linguistic dispute that arose in the papal Curia in 1435.
The first one--"Consciousness of the Latin Language among Humanists.