lateral pterygoid muscle

(redirected from Lateral pterygoid)

lat·er·al pter·y·goid mus·cle

(lat'ĕr-ăl ter'i-goyd mŭs'ĕl) [TA]
Masticatory muscle of infratemporal fossa; origin, inferior head from lateral lamina of pterygoid process; superior head from infratemporal crest and adjacent greater wing of the sphenoid; insertion, into pterygoid fovea of mandible and articular disc and capsule of temporomandibular joint; action, protrudes lower jaw to enable opening of mouth; unilateral contraction deviates chin laterally, enabling grinding motion for chewing; nerve supply, nerve to lateral pterygoid from mandibular division of trigeminal.
Synonym(s): external pterygoid muscle, musculus pterygoideus externus, musculus pterygoideus lateralis.

lateral pterygoid muscle

One of the mastication muscles. Origin: greater wing of sphenoid bone, lateral pterygoid plate. Insertion: pterygoid fovea of condyle of mandible. Nerve: trigeminal (CN V). Action: opens mouth, protrudes mandible.
Synonym: external pterygoid muscle See: arm for illus.
See also: muscle

lat·er·al pter·y·goid mus·cle

(lat'ĕr-ăl ter'i-goyd mŭs'ĕl) [TA]
Masticatory muscle of infratemporal fossa; origin, inferior head from lateral lamina of pterygoid process; superior head from infratemporal crest and adjacent greater wing of the sphenoid; insertion, into pterygoid fovea of mandible and articular disc and capsule of temporomandibular joint; action, protrudes lower jaw to enable opening of mouth; unilateral contraction deviates chin laterally, enabling grinding motion for chewing; nerve supply, nerve to lateral pterygoid from mandibular division of trigeminal.
Synonym(s): external pterygoid muscle, musculus pterygoideus externus, musculus pterygoideus lateralis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lateral pterygoid muscle, the only muscle of mastication serving to open the jaw, inserts on the mandibular condyle inferior to the articular surface but can partially insert on the joint capsule and disc as well.
Lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) abnormalities--Recent work has noted the importance of the lateral pterygoid muscle.
In some cases, the lateral pterygoid muscle was to be reattached to the prosthesis, so a 2-0 monofilament nylon suture or braided polyester suture was passed in a multiple mattress fashion through the lateral pterygoid muscle, prior to placement of the prosthesis components, for later securing of the muscle to the prosthetic condylar neck.
The suture previously placed through the lateral pterygoid muscle was looped around the neck of the mandibular component to secure the muscle to the prosthesis.
A postoperative MRI revealed no surgical damage to the PVP or lateral pterygoid muscle (figure 5, B).
The superior belly of the lateral pterygoid muscle inserts into the anterior portion of the disk.
Musculature removed during and debridement Retropharyngeal area Prevertebral fascia Longus capitis Longus colli Rectus capitis anterior Temporal fossa Medial pterygoid Lateral pterygoid Lower portion of temporalis Tensor veli palatini Levator veli palatini Portion of superior pharyngeal constrictor Portion of middle pharyngeal constrictor Neck Upper portion middle scalene Levator scapulae Splenius capitis Trapezius Sternocleidomastoid Occipitalis Longissimus capitis Semispinalis capitis Obliquus capitis superior Obliquus capitis inferior Rectus capitis posterior major Rectus capitis posterior minor Posterior belly digastric Stylohyoid Styloglossus Stylopharyngeus Buccinator
Pain on pressure in proximity to the lateral pterygoid muscles in an intraoral examination and evidence of bruxism are also indicative of TMD.
It had eroded the base of the pterygoid plates and infiltrated the lateral pterygoid muscle.
On intraoperative review of the earlier CT image, we observed that the sphenoid sinus did not pneumatize the lateral pterygoid recess.
Intraoperatively, however, the surgeon discovered a mass that involved the masseter and the lateral pterygoid muscles; the surgeon also noted that the bone had an eroded appearance.
Botulinum toxin injections are delivered to those muscles that appear to be the most spasmodic, usually the temporalis, masseter, and medial and lateral pterygoids.

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