law of Laplace

(redirected from Laplace's law)
Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

law of Laplace

(lah-plhas′)
[Pierre-Simon Laplace, Fr. scientist, 1749–1827]
A law stating that pressure within a tube is inversely proportional to the radius. The larger the diameter of a tubular structure, the less chance that it will rupture when subjected to an increase in pressure.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Laplace's law indicates that the tension on the wall of a sphere is the product of the pressure times the radius of the chamber and the tension is inversely related to the thickness of the wall.
Heart attacks can kill significant amount of myocardial tissue within the left ventricle, weakening it, and increasing ventricular wall tension if dilation occurs (via LaPlace's Law).
According to Laplace's law, wall tension is directly proportional to the intramural pressure and colon diameter.
In accordance with Laplace's law, the geometry of the ventricle is an important factor determining tension and segmental wall stress.