language

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language

 [lang´gwij]
1. the use of a meaningful pattern of vocal sounds (or corresponding written symbols) to convey thoughts and feelings, or a system of such patterns that is understood by a group of people.
2. by extension, any of various other systems of communication that use sets of discrete symbols.
3. any of numerous sets of standardized vocabulary terms for use among health care providers in a variety of settings allowing comparisons of care across populations, settings, regions, and time. There are over 30 researched standardized health care languages. Called also standardized vocabulary.
body language the expression of thoughts or emotions by means of posture or gesture.
International Sign language a sign language composed of a blending of vocabulary signs from numerous different countries, sometimes used at international meetings and events of deaf persons; formerly called Gestuno.
natural language ordinary language as used by the speakers of that language, as opposed to a language made up for a special purpose (as for use by a computer system).
nursing language any of various sets of standardized terms and definitions for use in nursing to provide standardized descriptions, labels, and definitions for expressing the phenomena of nursing; some include category groupings of terms. The American Nurses Association has recognized twelve official languages.

lan·guage

(lang'gwăj),
The use of spoken, manual, written, and other symbols to express, represent, or receive communication.
[L. lingua]

clinical etiquette

Professional comportment Medical practice The components of medical practice which, in addition to ethics and competence, define what it is to be a physician
Clinical etiquette
Bedside manner Avoid easy familiarity, be attentive of Pts needs, do not eat on rounds
Dress Conservative & appropriate
Grooming Clean, neat, unobtrusive
Language Respectful, at level of audience, non-use of vulgar vernacular or demeaning appellations, discretion regarding others' condition (JAMA 1988; 260:2559)  

lan·guage

(lang'gwăj)
The use of spoken, manual, written, and other symbols to express, represent, or receive communication.
[L. lingua]

lan·guage

(lang'gwăj)
Use of spoken, manual, written, and other symbols to express, represent, or receive communication.
[L. lingua]

Patient discussion about language

Q. what is leukemia in lay person language, what causes it, what are the symptomes, and is it cancer

A. Leukemia is cancer of white blood cells. there are about 6-7 types of Leukemia i think...i'll have to check that one out. it basically means a white blood cell got mutated and started to multiply like crazy. causes severe problems. the types defer in which part of maturation it got cancerous. i hope i helped- if you still need more information, just ask! i'm here.

Q. Do I have to speak Chinese to study Chinese medicine? I’m thinking about studying Chinese medicine next year at a local college. Do I have to study Chinese before I start studying? Will it make any difference?

A. The main language of China is Mandarin. Hong Kong is Cantonese. Tawainese people speak (duh) Tawainese and Mandarin. Then you have like hundreds of other dialects from small provinces and island. I speak Mandarin which is the official language. A lot of Chinese People speak more than one dialect.

If I was you, I would go with Mandarin because it is becoming a standard in China. (Although Cantonese is very very popular in NYC, esp in Chinatown)

There are books at Barnes and Nobles that include audio lesson and video lessons, if you don't want to take a class, you can try that.

http://mandarin.about.com/
http://in.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=4E31423D4420774B&playnext=1&v=KSjpDj4s03k
http://learnchinesereviews.com/Learn-Chinese-Vocabulary-For-Family

More discussions about language
References in classic literature ?
"Why, I don't understand your language. You see, I came from the Country of the Gillikins, so that I am a foreigner."
A large part of one of Wundt's two vast volumes on language in his "Volkerpsychologie" is concerned with gesture-language.
I spoke entirely in that language. He was greatly interested; and after I had talked a while he said my German was very rare, possibly a "unique"; and wanted to add it to his museum.
But that was later, and not because Latin was the language of the people, but because it was the language of the learned and of the monks, who were the chief people who wrote books.
They evidently understood neither the language of England nor of France.
Here by intermarriage with the native women they rapidly developed into a race which while retaining all their original courage and enterprise took on also, together with the French language, the French intellectual brilliancy and flexibility and in manners became the chief exponent of medieval chivalry.
It meant nothing to Tarzan, of course, for he could not tell one language from another, so when he pointed to the word man which he had printed upon a piece of bark he learned from D'Arnot that it was pronounced HOMME, and in the same way he was taught to pronounce ape, SINGE and tree, ARBRE.
As soon as they found that he could talk their language, they told him where the pain was and how they felt, and of course it was easy for him to cure them.
Those who have not learned to read the ancient classics in the language in which they were written must have a very imperfect knowledge of the history of the human race; for it is remarkable that no transcript of them has ever been made into any modern tongue, unless our civilization itself may be regarded as such a transcript.
Sweet, with boundless contempt for my stupidity, would reply that it not only meant but obviously was the word Result, as no other Word containing that sound, and capable of making sense with the context, existed in any language spoken on earth.
It now began to be known and talked of in the neighbourhood, that my master had found a strange animal in the field, about the bigness of a SPLACNUCK, but exactly shaped in every part like a human creature; which it likewise imitated in all its actions; seemed to speak in a little language of its own, had already learned several words of theirs, went erect upon two legs, was tame and gentle, would come when it was called, do whatever it was bid, had the finest limbs in the world, and a complexion fairer than a nobleman's daughter of three years old.
Before an anchor can ever be raised, it must be let go; and this perfectly obvious truism brings me at once to the subject of the degradation of the sea language in the daily press of this country.

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