universal

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universal

(ū″nĭ-vĕr′săl) [L. universalis, combined into one]
Applicable to or commonly found in every condition, situation, or member of a population.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Palmaitis' language universal wholly excludes a possiblity that in Uralic languages as those lacking any grammatical gender could have an accusative case.
The idea behind "linguistics as a science" and the search for language universals is that human cognitive life is much more rigidly constrained than people have traditionally supposed.
Iris Berent of Northeastern University and researchers at Harvard Medical School shows the brains of individual speakers are sensitive to language universals. Syllables that are frequent across languages are recognized more readily than infrequent syllables.
It reviews research on the linguistic sequences of interlanguage development (morpheme accuracy order, verbal and phrasal negatives question formation, relativization, and word order) and research on SLA processes (language universals; linguistic universals; cognitive theories; cognitive processes, input, and interaction; and cognitive processes and evidence).
xxi), the grammar is not intended for beginners but for "advanced students of the language and scholars specializing in Amharic studies," and perhaps "the general Semitist who might be interested in a specific feature of the language yet not be familiar with the Amharic script." However, with the phonemic transcriptions, probably any knowledgeable linguist will be able to make good use of the grammar, if with a bit of native-speaker assistance - so the grammar should also be able to serve even the rapidly growing subfield of linguistic typology and the search for language universals, in which, regarding syntax, Amharic is a notable frequent exception to generalizations.
Language universals regulate what is possible and what is impossible in the structure of a language and make statements to the effect that some characteristics are found in all the world's languages while others are not found in any.
177-181), but devotes only several pages to it and examines it only with respect to language universals. Here she describes only the old and well-known results of J.

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