adsorption

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adsorption

 [ad-sorp´shun]
the action of a substance in attracting and holding other materials or particles on its surface; see also absorption.
attachment (def. 2).

ad·sorp·tion

(ad-sōrp'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with absorption.
The property of a solid substance of attracting and holding to its surface a gas, liquid, or a substance in solution or in suspension, for example, condensation of a gas onto a surface. Compare: absorption.
[L. ad, to, + sorbeo, to suck up]

adsorption

/ad·sorp·tion/ (ad-sorp´shun) the action of a substance in attracting and holding other materials or particles on its surface.

adsorption

[adsôrp′shən]
Etymology: L, ad + sorbere, to suck in
a natural process whereby molecules of a gas or liquid adhere to the surface of a solid. The phenomenon depends on an assortment of factors such as surface tension and electrical charges. Many biological reactions involve adsorption. Adsorption is the principle on which chromatography is based and which allows for the separation of a mixture into component fractions for qualitative analysis. See also chromatography. adsorb, v.

Adsorption

Chemistry An accumulation/concentration of molecules of a gas or liquid on a surface interfacing with the gas or liquid, resulting in a relatively high surface concentration.
Histology The accumulation of a substance on a surface affected by the affinities of acids to bases—and vice versa—based on electrical attraction; adsorption may explain differential affinity for dyes that occurs in histologic preparations of tissues being examined by light microscopy.
Immunology The removal of nonspecific agglutinins, by incubating the fluid of interest in a serum—e.g., of bovine origin—which lacks the antigens to be measured.
Virology The adhesion of a substance to an organic particle in a solution—e.g., adhesion of a virus to a cell.

ad·sorp·tion

(ad-sōrp'shŭn)
The property of a solid substance to attract and hold to its surface a gas, liquid, or a substance in solution or in suspension.
Compare: absorption
[L. ad, to, + sorbeo, to suck in]

adsorption

The process by which a substance, such as a gas or dissolved solid, is attracted to, and adheres to, a surface.

adsorption

the taking up of gas or liquid by a surface or interface. In physical adsorption, molecules are held by VAN DER WAAL'S FORCES of attraction; in chemical adsorption there is exchange or sharing of electrons. Compare ABSORPTION.

Adsorption

The binding of a chemical (e.g., drug or poison) to a solid material such as activated charcoal or clay.
Mentioned in: Charcoal, Activated

adsorption,

n a process in which gaseous material builds up on the outermost layer of a solid and forms a light film.

ad·sorp·tion

(ad-sōrp'shŭn) Do not confuse this word with absorption.
The property of a solid substance of attracting and holding to its surface a gas, liquid, or a substance in solution or in suspension.
[L. ad, to, + sorbeo, to suck in]

adsorption,

n a natural process whereby molecules of a gas or liquid adhere to the surface of a solid.

adsorption

the action of a substance in attracting and holding other materials or particles on its surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
Langmuir isotherm practicability for RR-195 adsorption onto MRH particles can be assessed by numerical values of a constant conventionally called as dimensionless separation/ equilibrium factor RL.
The Freundlich isotherm described the equilibrium adsorption data of acid dyes on CFA better than the Langmuir isotherm [19].
It can be observed from Figures 12 and 13 that Langmuir isotherm model is the best fit model when compared to Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm model for adsorbent treated with both HCl and KOH.
By comparing the correlation coefficient values obtained from the Langmuir, Freundlich and D-R isotherm models, it can be concluded that the Langmuir isotherm model is more suitable for CV/ZFA while the experimental data obtained for CV/ZBA were fitted well by the Freundlich isotherm model.
However, Langmuir isotherm gives better correlation ([R.
Langmuir isotherm constants were calculated from the following equation:
In some cases the Langmuir isotherm fails to describe P sorption data, particularly at higher concentrations of solution P, where the curve does not flatten as it should in the case of surface of a constant sorption maximum.
The concentration of component i in the solid phase can be linked to a multi-component isotherm such as the commonly-used Langmuir isotherm (in dimensionless form),
The conformation of the data from adsorption studies to Langmuir isotherm indicates the formation of monolayer of adsorbate on the adsorbent surface.