Langerhans cell

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Langerhans cell

(läng′ər-häns′)
n.
An antigen-presenting dendritic cell of the epidermis, containing characteristic rod-shaped granules (Birbeck granules). Langerhans cells are thought to stimulate T cells in lymph nodes to which they migrate and also T cells in the skin.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Langerhans cell

An antigen-presenting dendritic cell found in the skin. These cells pick up and process antigen in the skin and then move to the nearest lymph node where the antigen is presented to T cells. In this way the immune system may become sensitized to a contact allergen. (Paul Wilhelm Langerhans 1847–88, German physician, who described these cells when he was a medical student.)
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
HPE of the tissue showed positive for Langhans cells with AFB +ve.
Presence of foamy macrophages in 66.66%, macrophage granuloma in 66.66%, and Langhans cells in 66.66% cases was observed.
Macrophages in granulomas may fuse to form multinucleated giant cells, Langhans cells. Local secretion of the cytokine TNF is required for optimal granuloma structure.