Lane

(redirected from Lanes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to Lanes: York Lanes

Lane

(lān),
William Arbuthnot, English surgeon, 1856-1943. See: Lane band, Lane disease.
A ‘corridor’ on an electrophoretic support medium
References in classic literature ?
They could not stop in Edgware because of the growing traffic through the place, and so they had come into this side lane.
Several wayfarers came along the lane, and of these my brother gathered such news as he could.
She would not make herself conspicuous by waiting on the spot, and she started to get past the church into the lane. But as she reached the churchyard-gate the people began pouring out, and Tess found herself in the midst of them.
Along the tedious length of Benvill Lane she began to grow tired, and she leant upon gates and paused by milestones.
"And have a conveyance at the road-end of the lane as near an hour hence as you possibly can?"
I - I'm not fit to be out at all; it must be a closed conveyance; but I'll come to the end of the lane to save time, so let him wait there.
Nor though the old lady would by no means hear of Rebecca's departure, was the latter regularly installed in office in Park Lane. Like many wealthy people, it was Miss Crawley's habit to accept as much service as she could get from her inferiors; and good-naturedly to take leave of them when she no longer found them useful.
Nothing could have been more in accordance with Sam Weller's feelings than the projected exposure of the real propensities and qualities of the red-nosed man; and it being very near the appointed hour of meeting, the father and son took their way at once to Brick Lane, Sam not forgetting to drop his letter into a general post-office as they walked along.
It was in this shaded and raspberried lane that Walter had wooed and won her.
FLOPSY, Mopsy, and Cottontail, who were good little bunnies, went down the lane to gather blackberries;
The murderer was gone long ago; but there lay his victim in the middle of the lane, incredibly mangled.
MILLWARD,' I exclaimed, in a tone of wrathful menace that made the reverend gentleman look round - aghast - astounded at such unwonted insolence, and stare me in the face, with a look that plainly said, 'What, this to me!' But I was too indignant to apologise, or to speak another word to him: I turned away, and hastened homewards, descending with rapid strides the steep, rough lane, and leaving him to follow as he pleased.