Beer-Lambert law

(redirected from Lambert-Beer law)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

Beer-Lam·bert law

(bēr lam'bert),
the absorbance of light is directly proportional to the thickness of the media through which the light is being transmitted multiplied by the concentration of absorbing chromophore; that is, A = εbc where A is the absorbance, ε is the molar extinction coefficient, b is the thickness of the solution, and c is the concentration.
[August Beer, Johann Heinrich Lambert]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Beer’s law

A law stating that the concentration of an analyte is directly proportional to the amount of light absorbed, or inversely proportional to the logarithm of the transmitted light.

Beer’s law
A = abc = log(100/%T) 2 - log %T

where: 
A = absorbance
a = absorptivity
b = light path of the solution in cm
c = concentration of the substance of interest
%T = per cent transmittance—the ratio of transmitted light to incident light
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Beer,

August, German physicist, 1825-1863.
Beer-Lambert law - the absorbance of light is directly proportional to the thickness of the ligand through which the light is being transmitted multiplied by the concentration of absorbing chromophore.
Beer law - the intensity of a color or of a light ray is inversely proportional to the depth of liquid through which it is transmitted.

Lambert,

Johann Heinrich, German mathematician and physicist, 1728-1777.
Beer-Lambert law - see under Beer, August
Lambert cosine law - mathematical measure of the intensity of radiation.
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Lambert-Beer Law of Absorption [I.sub.t] = [I.sub.0] exp ((-MAC)*[rho]*t)
Distance 10 % It % ([micro]m) (absorbed (remaining intensity) intensity) 0 0 100 5 25 75 13.8 50 50 27.5 75 25 45.8 90 10 50.0 92 8 Figure 1: The Lambert-Beer Law shows the logarithmic behavior of X-rays absorbed and remaining for a nickel foil.
The concentration of the adsorbed dye was calculated by using the Lambert-Beer law:
The determination of the molar extinction coefficients of caffeine at 272 nm and of CGA at 330 nm was realized by applying the well-known Lambert-Beer law, by fitting linearly the dependence of the absorbance versus the sample concentration.
Indeed, the separation of caffeine and CGAs by the analysis of the spectrum profile of the green coffee extract here performed allows determining the CGAs concentration by the application of the Lambert-Beer law using the absorbance in the range where caffeine is not absorbed.
Absorption measurement for the frequency corresponded to the maximum absorption line can be done by applying directly the Lambert-Beer law. Thus, a light source of very stable frequency ought to be applied for a slight deviation from the central frequency results in considerable errors.
The second joining part absorbs the laser radiation in a way, which can be described by the Lambert-Beer law. A technologically important parameter in this process is the penetration depth of the radiation and, connected to this, the depth of the melting zone and the temperature of the generated molten plastics.