lake

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lake

 [lāk]
1. to undergo separation of hemoglobin from erythrocytes.
2. a circumscribed collection of fluid in a hollow or depressed cavity; see also lacuna.
lacrimal lake the triangular space at the medial angle of the eye, where the tears collect. See also lacrimal apparatus.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lake

(lāk), [TA]
1. A small collection of fluid. Synonym(s): lacus [TA]
2. To cause blood plasma to become red as a result of the release of hemoglobin from the erythrocytes, such as when the latter are suspended in water.

See also: lacuna.
[A.S. lacu, fr. L. lacus, lake]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lake

(lāk)
1. [TA] A small collection of fluid.
Synonym(s): lacus.
2. To cause blood plasma to turn red as a result of the release of hemoglobin from erythrocytes.
See also: lacuna
[A.S. lacu, fr. L. lacus, lake]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lake

(lāk)
1. Small collection of fluid.
2. To cause blood plasma to become red as a result of hemoglobin release from erythrocytes.
[A.S. lacu, fr. L. lacus, lake]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
They look so snug and so homelike, and at eventide when every thing seems to slumber, and the music of the vesper bells comes stealing over the water, one almost believes that nowhere else than on the lake of Como can there be found such a paradise of tranquil repose.
From my window here in Bellaggio, I have a view of the other side of the lake now, which is as beautiful as a picture.
At length it was found necessary to establish fortified posts at the confluence of the rivers and the lakes for the protection of the trade, and the restraint of these profligates of the wilderness.
Daylight won across Chilcoot that same day, dropping down five hundred feet in the darkness and the flurrying snow to Crater Lake, where he camped.
1851, with Overweg, to visit the kingdom of Adamaoua, to the south of the lake, and from there he pushed on as far as the town of Yola, a little below nine degrees north latitude.
So rapid was the progress of the light vessels, that the lake curled in their front, in miniature waves, and their motion became undulating by its own velocity.
Captain Sublette, in one of his early expeditions across the mountains, is said to have sent four men in a skin canoe, to explore the lake, who professed to have navigated all round it; but to have suffered excessively from thirst, the water of the lake being extremely salt, and there being no fresh streams running into it.
The country around the lake was well cultivated, for the Mormons are mostly farmers; while ranches and pens for domesticated animals, fields of wheat, corn, and other cereals, luxuriant prairies, hedges of wild rose, clumps of acacias and milk-wort, would have been seen six months later.
After a long look at the lake through the trees, I came to a positive conclusion at last.
From this high backbone of earth, to the north, across the diminishing, down-falling ranges, we caught a glimpse of a far lake. The sun shone upon it, and about it were open, level grass-lands, while to the eastward we saw the dark line of a wide-stretching forest.
The tenants of the lake were far-famed for both their quantities and their quality, and the ice had hardly disappeared before numberless little boats were launched from the shores, and the lines of the fishermen were dropped into the inmost recesses of its deepest caverns, tempting the unwary animals with every variety of bait that the ingenuity or the art of man had invented.
Then this wicked enchantress changed the capital, which was a very populous and flourishing city, into the lake and desert plain you saw.