Lake Nyos


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A crater lake in Cameroon which, in 1986, was the site of a massive natural release of CO2 gas from a pocket of magma, which caused the deaths of an estimated 1,700 people and 3,500 livestock. It was the first known large-scale asphyxiation caused by a natural event
References in periodicals archive ?
scientists have recently returned from a follow-up study of last year's Lake Nyos disaster in Cameroon, in which the lake had expelled a large cloud of carbon dioxide that spread into surrounding valleys, asphyxiating livestock and killing 1,746 people.
11 on the Lake Nyos disaster that killed at least 1,700 people last August when a gas cloud escaped from the Cameroon lake (SN: 1/17/87, p.
Just as final reports are being issued onthe disaster that killed 1,746 people last August when an asphyxiating carbon dioxide cloud exploded from Lake Nyos in Cameroon (SN: 9/20/86, p.
Scientists may never know exactly what caused a cloud of gases to escape from Cameroon's Lake Nyos on the evening of Aug.
The more than 1,500 people who perished after a gaseous cloud escaped from Lake Nyos in Cameroon on Aug.
The overall objective of this call is to sustainably improve the living conditions of the population in the Lake Nyos zone.
1986: More than 1700 people were killed when a cloud of gas escaped from Lake Nyos in Cameroon.
The Lake Nyos (Cameroon) disaster showed what could happen if Co2 were suddenly released into the air.
00pm) This documentary examines the circumstances surrounding the mysterious deaths of nearly 2,000 people near Lake Nyos in north-west Cameroon, severely depleting the populations of three lakeside villages.
00pm) The mysterious deaths of nearly 2,000 people living on Lake Nyos in north-west Cameroon, severely depleting the populations of three lakeside villages.
NATURE Shock (five, 8pm) tells how, more than 20 years ago, hundreds of people who lived by the banks of Lake Nyos in north-west Cameroon dropped dead without any obvious signs of injury or struggle.
This nightmare scenario was brought to life via Cameroon's Lake Nyos in 1986, when a landslide shifting tonnes of rocks into the lake bed resulted in the penetration of gasses, including previously trapped carbon.