incubation period

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incubation

 [in″ku-ba´shun]
1. the provision of proper conditions for growth and development, as for bacterial or tissue cultures.
2. the development of an infectious disease from time of the entrance of the pathogen to the appearance of clinical symptoms.
3. the development of the embryo in the egg of oviparous animals.
4. the maintenance of an artificial environment for a newborn, especially a premature infant.
incubation period the interval of time required for development; especially the time between invasion of the body by a pathogenic organism and appearance of the first symptoms of disease. Incubation periods vary from a few days to several months, depending on the causative organism and type of disease.

period

 [pēr´e-od]
an interval or division of time; the time for the regular recurrence of a phenomenon.
absolute refractory period the part of the refractory period from phase 0 to approximately −60 mV during phase 3; during this time it is impossible for the myocardium to respond with a propagated action potential, even with a strong stimulus. Called also effective refractory period.
blanking period a period of time during and after a pacemaker stimulus when the unstimulated chamber is insensitive to avoid sensing the electronic event in the stimulated chamber.
effective refractory period absolute refractory period.
ejection period the second phase of ventricular systole (0.21 to 0.30 sec), between the opening and closing of the semilunar valves, while the blood is discharged into the aorta and pulmonary artery. Called also sphygmic period.
gestation period see gestation period.
incubation period see incubation period.
isoelectric period the moment in muscular contraction when no deflection of the galvanometer is produced.
latency period
latent period a seemingly inactive period, as that between exposure to an infection and the onset of illness (incubation period) or that between the instant of stimulation and the beginning of response (latency, def. 2).
refractory period the period of depolarization and repolarization of the cell membrane after excitation; during the first portion (absolute refractory period), the nerve or muscle fiber cannot respond to a second stimulus, whereas during the relative refractory period it can respond only to a strong stimulus.
relative refractory period the part of the refractory period from approximately −60 mV during phase 3 to the end of phase 3; during this time a depressed response to a strong stimulus is possible.
safe period the period during the menstrual cycle when conception is considered least likely to occur; it comprises approximately the ten days after menstruation begins and the ten days preceding menstruation. See the section on fertility awareness methods, under contraception.
sphygmic period ejection period.
supernormal period in electrocardiography, a period at the end of phase 3 of the action potential during which activation can be initiated with a milder stimulus than is required at maximal repolarization, because at this time the cell is excitable and closer to threshold than at maximal diastolic potential.
vulnerable period that time at the peak of the T wave during which serious arrhythmias are likely to result if a stimulus occurs.
Wenckebach's period a usually repetitive sequence seen in partial heart block, marked by progressive lengthening of the P–R interval; see also dropped beat.

in·cu·ba·tion pe·ri·od

1. time interval between invasion of the body by an infecting organism and the appearance of the first sign or symptom it causes; Synonym(s): incubative stage, latent period (2) , latent stage, stage of invasion
2. in a disease vector, the period between entry of the disease organism and the time at which the vector is capable of transmitting the disease to another human host.

incubation period

The time elapsed between infection and appearance of disease Sx. Cf Latent period Epidemiology A period of subclinical or inapparent pathologic changes after exposure, ending with the onset of Sx of an infection.

in·cu·ba·tion pe·ri·od

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn pēr'ē-ŏd)
1. The interval between invasion of the body by an infecting organism and the appearance of the first sign or symptom it causes.
Synonym(s): incubative stage, latent period (3) , latent stage, prodromal stage.
2. In a disease vector, the period between entry of the disease organism and the time at which the vector is capable of transmitting the disease to another human host.

incubation period

The interval between the time of infection and the first appearance of symptoms of the resulting disease. Incubation periods vary widely, from as little as a few hours in the case of CHOLERA to many weeks in some cases of RABIES.

Incubation period

The interval from initial exposure to an infectious agent, such as a virus, and the first symptoms of illness.

in·cu·ba·tion pe·ri·od

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn pēr'ē-ŏd)
1. The interval between invasion of the body by an infecting organism and the appearance of the first sign or symptom it causes.
Synonym(s): latent period (3) , latent stage, prodromal stage.
2. In a disease vector, the period between entry of the disease organism and the time at which the vector is capable of transmitting the disease to another human host.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Scottish study corroborated the idea of a short lag time by finding a "highly significant" correlation between melanoma diagnoses and severe sunburns occurring just five years earlier.
maximum value, lag time, time of the inflection point, its value and etc were also given.
Increasing the ascorbate concentration produced a dose-dependent increase in lag time in both oxidizing systems.
Protocols affect lag time tremendously, with true streaming protocols such as real-time transport protocol (RTP) and real-time messaging protocol (RTMP) being used for live streaming.
The results in Table 3 showed thrombin generation in cardioembolic stroke, detailing prolonged lag time (p = 0.005) and ttP (p = 0.002) at base line and time 2 and lag time (p = 0.004) and ttP (p = 0.05) with corresponding elevated D-dimer (p = 0.0001) at baseline and time 2.
The volume of calls has greatly dropped, and zero complaints about a lag time in notification were logged for fall 2015.
Where, (Eq.) is degradation at time t; (Eq.) is potentially degradable fraction in the rumen at time t; L is lag time. The lag time is the initial phase during which either no degradation occurs or it occurs at a greatly reduced rate.
Resuming the primary task results in a lag time which represents the time it takes to retrieve the goal from memory, before it is entirely forgotten.
Flood hydraulic modelling and floodplain mapping was integrated to perform flood routing for the computation of peak flow attenuation, assessment of lag time between inflow and out flow and to perform mapping for the estimation of flood zone depth and flooded area of reach.
lag time) under stationary conditions (while working under actual conditions), its working condition were simulated in the workshop.
The pharmacokinetic profile of RAYOS is different with a four-hour lag time from that of immediate-release prednisone formulations.
Its electronic viewfinder is extremely responsive with a tiny lag time, so when you tweak things like filters or exposure, you can see the effects in real time.