Laënnec

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Laënnec

 [la-nek´]
René Théophile Hyacinthe (1781–1826). French physician. He is known for the invention of the stethoscope in 1819 and his De l'auscultation médiate, from which much of our knowledge of chest diseases is derived.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Laën·nec

(lah-ĕ-nek'),
René T.H., French physician, 1781-1826. See: Laënnec cirrhosis, Laënnec pearls.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Later that year, Laennec was examining a woman with "general symptoms of a diseased heart." He was unfortunately unable to glean anything further via application of his hand to the chest or using percussion.
Laennec certainly must have found this mode of medical examination of the patient embarrassing, especially in the case of female patients.
It's why Finns at Nokia invented texting (they couldn't bear face-to-face rejection when proposing dates) and why in 1816 Dr Laennec came up with his auscultatory prosthesis (initially, a tube).
In a different vein, Laennec Hurbon understands Guadeloupean prejudices toward Haitian and Dominican migrants as an attempt to resist colonial oppression by creating an imaginary pure and authentic Guadeloupean space free of foreign cultures, even though Haitian culture has significantly influenced Guadeloupean music, language, and popular religion (Hurbon 1983).
By 1846 the stethoscope was part of the teaching course and there were many variations on Laennec's design.
The idea for the stethoscope came to a young French physician, Rene Laennec, when he had stopped to watch two children at play.
Another story, Marklake Witches, which features Rene Laennec, the inventor of the stethoscope, also drew on the life of William Osier.
Abrams, April 1995), Laennec Hurbon traces Haiti's now officially recognized religion from its African origins to its current manifestations.
The gradual demise of a famed public institution -- Paris' l'Hopital Laennec -- provides occasion for an absorbing look at professionals who deal with death every day in "A Hospital Remembers," international docmeister Mark Kidel's new pic.
Laboratory of voice, biomaterials and cervicofacial oncology, CNRSUPRESA 7018, University of Paris V, Laennec Hospital, 42 rue de Sevres, 75007 Paris, France.