lacerate

(redirected from Lacerations)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to Lacerations: wound

lacerate

(lăs′ə-rāt′)
tr.v. lacer·ated, lacer·ating, lacer·ates
To rip, cut, or tear.
adj. (-rĭt, -rāt′)
1. Torn; mangled.
2. Wounded.

lacerate

(las′ĕ-rāt″) [L. lacerare, to tear]
To tear, as into irregular segments. lacerable (las′ĕ-ră-bĕl), adjective; lacerated (las′ĕ-rāt″ĕd), adjective

lacerate

having the appearance of being torn.

Patient discussion about lacerate

Q. I am scheduled for scope surgery for a torn meniscus on my knee and what is the duration for recovery? Has anyone had this surgery for a torn meniscus? How did you deal with this recovery?

A. The recovery process is individual, and you cannot predict it in advance. I know someone who has done it and was able to go back to exercising regularly after 2 months. I would think the recovery from the surgery itself is a matter of few weeks until you can walk properly, however you should still give your knee a break and rest for a while after.

More discussions about lacerate
References in periodicals archive ?
Cosmetic concerns, good blood supply of face and laxity of facial skin make facial lacerations unique.
This study included all patients presenting to the emergency clinic with eyelid tears and canalicular lacerations.
A male German shepherd dog was presented with traumatic laceration of the lateral canthus of left eye.
7,8] The possible risks to the baby include skin laceration, cephalhematoma, clavicular, and skull fractures, brachial plexus injury, and facial nerve palsy.
Mandibular fractures may present with swelling, numbness, and intraoral lacerations.
Moving objects, motor vehicle accidents, falling, and fighting were the main causes of lid lacerations in the study population.
Prevalence and risk factors for third- and fourth-degree perineal lacerations during vaginal delivery: a multi-country study.
By searching other researches and carrying out precise studies, Zahedi discovered the appropriate nanopolymer for bandages and suitable additives such as antibiotics in order for a faster treatment of lacerations, and he optimized the device and operation parameters in order to produce the best product.
In view of the contained area of neck emphysema, a flexible fibreoptic bronchoscope was used to view the airway and a linear laceration over the posterior wall (membranous) of the trachea, approximately 3 cm in length at 6 cm proximal to the carinal spur, was seen.
Major trauma was defined as second-, third-, or fourth-degree lacerations or any trauma requiring suturing.
A study compared infection rates for 442 lacerations (IMJ Ill.