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labyrinth

 [lab´ĭ-rinth]
the inner ear, consisting of the vestibule, cochlea, and semicircular canals. The cochlea is concerned with hearing and the vestibule and semicircular canals with the sense of equilibrium. (See also color plates.) adj., adj labyrin´thine. 

The bony portion of the labyrinth (osseous labyrinth) is composed of a series of canals tunneled out of the temporal bone. Inside the osseous labyrinth is the membranous labyrinth, which conforms to the general shape of the osseous labyrinth but is much smaller. A fluid called perilymph fills the space (perilymphatic space) between the osseous and membranous labyrinths. Fluid inside the membranous labyrinth is called endolymph. These fluids play an important role in the transmission of sound waves and the maintenance of body balance. The membranous labyrinth is divided into two parts: the cochlear labyrinth, which includes the perilymphatic space and the cochlear duct, and the vestibular labyrinth, which includes the utricle, saccule, and semicircular canals.

Disorders of the inner ear, such as labyrinthitis and meniere's disease, are characterized by episodes of dizziness, tinnitus, and hearing loss.
ethmoid labyrinth (ethmoidal labyrinth) either of the paired lateral masses of the ethmoid bone, consisting of numerous thin-walled cellular cavities, the ethmoidal cells.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lab·y·rinth

(lab'i-rinth), [TA] Any of several anatomic structures with numerous intercommunicating cells or canals.
1. The internal or inner ear, composed of the semicircular ducts, vestibule, and cochlea.
2. Any group of communicating cavities, as in each lateral mass of the ethmoid bone.
3. A group of upright test tubes terminating below in a base of communicating, alternately ⊔-shaped and ⊓-shaped tubes, used for isolating motile from nonmotile organisms in culture, or a motile from a less motile organism (as the typhoid from the colon bacillus), the former traveling faster and farther through the tubes than the latter.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

labyrinth

(lăb′ə-rĭnth′)
n.
1.
a. An intricate structure of interconnecting passages through which it is difficult to find one's way; a maze.
b. Labyrinth Greek Mythology The maze in which the Minotaur was confined.
2. A design consisting of a single unbranching but highly convoluted path leading from the outside to the center of a usually circular or square space.
3. Something highly intricate or convoluted in character, composition, or construction: a labyrinth of rules and regulations.
4. Anatomy
a. A group of complex interconnecting anatomical cavities.
b. See inner ear.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lab·y·rinth

(labi-rinth) [TA]
1. The internal or inner ear, composed of the semicircular ducts, vestibule, and cochlea.
2. Any group of communicating cavities, as in each lateral mass of the ethmoid bone.
3. A group of communicating culture tubes used for separating motile from nonmotile microorganisms.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

labyrinth

Any group of communicating anatomical cavities, especially the internal ear, comprizing the vestibule, semicircular canals and the cochlea.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Labyrinth

The bony cavity of the inner ear.
Mentioned in: Labyrinthitis
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

lab·y·rinth

(labi-rinth) [TA]
Internal or inner ear, composed of the semicircular ducts, vestibule, and cochlea.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A project to build a labyrinth designed to improve wellbeing and mental health in a Paisley park has received support from Renfrewshire Council's Community Empowerment Fund.
| Find out more about the book and Kate's courses at www.humblebynature.com THE LABYRINTH LESS SOMETHING that I always take into consideration with regard to garden design is creating a 'walk' around the garden.
Readers will discover how to work with labyrinths to quiet your mind and gain insights and answers for the questions that matter most to you.
9 kilometres long.I was inspired from the labyrinths abroad, said Miroslav Sedlaacutek, executive director of the Sezaland company and owner of the field, as quoted by the TASR newswire.
Thomas parishioner, will facilitate "The Road to Jerusalem," relying on her experience in walking labyrinths and offering similar programs since the time she walked her first labyrinth at the Cathedral of Chartres, France, one of the oldest Christian labyrinths.
The 9th Annual World Labyrinth Day will be celebrated Saturday, with six local labyrinths participating in the observance of the international event.
In the novel eight kidnapped characters, while trying to escape from their rooms and labyrinths, replace the tribunal sacrifice just as a virtual reality game replaces the actual sacrifice.
Labyrinth walking is a very powerful spiritual practice, and I walk labyrinths regularly.
Branching out through history, labyrinths have appeared far and wide: from interior decoration to art, from pleasure gardens to religious symbolism.
Chapter 6 deals with twentieth century postmodern expressions of the labyrinth. The works that Hackworth discusses include Umberto Eco's The Name of the Rose, Lawrence Durrell's 1947 novel, The Dark Labyrinth, Borges's translated collection of short stories titled Labyrinths, and John Barth's Lost in the Funhouse.
The difference is that you lose yourself in a maze and you find yourself in a labyrinth. And labyrinths are popping up everywhere, in schools, hospitals and community parks, as well as in churches and retreat houses.