retriever

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retriever

a type of hunting dog used for recovering the shot bird, often from water; includes the specific breeds, Chesapeake Bay, Curly-coated, Flat-coated, Golden and Labrador retrievers, and Wire-haired pointing griffon, but various spaniels may also perform retrieving duties in the field.
References in periodicals archive ?
Labrador won a state legislature seat in 2006 and quickly made waves in the capitol.
National Chief Shawn A-in-chut Atleo and Ghislain Picard, chief of the Assembly of First Nations of Quebec and Labrador, both weighed in to support the Innu's right to hunt.
Literacy also arrived with the European men, many of them literate employees of the Hudson's Bay Company, who settled in Labrador and married Inuit women.
After 13 years of working on this problem, we now have the definitive answer about the syndrome's true cause for Labrador breeders and owners.
The earlier chapters offer interesting reading and paint an exhaustive picture of everything that touches on the theme of "Germanness" as it relates to Newfoundland and Labrador.
Wojick was reacting to Ontario's plan to open talks with authorities in Newfoundland and Quebec to examine how feasible it is to transmit hydroelectric power from Labrador into Ontario.
The university is looking for 20 adult Labrador dogs less than two years old that are showing early signs of elbow osteo-arthritis.
Russell, who is Metis (mixed indigenous and European) was most recently president of the Labrador Metis Nation and served from 2001 to 2004 as co-chair of the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples, a church committee with national representation from various native groups.
A family left heartbroken after their two pet labrador dogs ran off have offered a reward for their return.
THE Labrador Retriever, to give the dog its full title, is named after a beautiful and desolate peninsula in northern Canada called Labrador.
The five British judges, who heard the case for the Privy Council, ruled that the evidence of a key prosecution witness was too unreliable to convict William Labrador of murdering Lois McMillen, a 34-year-old artist from Connecticut.
In particular, reference to the abuse of Innu children in Labrador by clergy, which occupies fully one-third of the article, is misplaced and misleading.